One shortcoming of Musical Notation

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetsplus, Jan 10, 2015.

  1. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hmm, I am not so sure about the pairing issue. Generally because dotted 8th/16ths are not played rhythmically enough very often I even make a point of separating the 16ths from the next note in a section rehearsal.

    Still, you are very right about the missing ownership. Is that not only a problem with modern notation however? My scores from Heinrich Schütz, Hassler, Prätorius, Schein or other Rennaissance/baroque era composers have long strings of notes tied together as well as the mensur measure markings that do a far better job of following the musical line.
     
  3. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    You can really clutter up a chart trying to faithfully reproduce the sound on paper. We can almost assume that, to a degree, close enough is good enough and leave the rest up to judgment and interpretation. The challenge is that everyone in the ensemble needs to be on the same figurative page.
     
  4. therealnod

    therealnod Pianissimo User

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    I said it before, this is exactly what conductors are for. At some point the score is just a guide...the collective ensemble gives it life.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    No, this has to happen long before it reaches the conductors ears. If we can't play phrases and have the basic interpretation down BEFORE playing it for someone, we need serious help. The point here is currently scores are NOT necessarily documenting the composers intentions as the notation conventions are pretty primitive!

     
  6. therealnod

    therealnod Pianissimo User

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    Uhm, damn near everything an instrument can do there is a notation for. If that is lacking in current scores that is a problem of the composer, the arranger, or the printer.
     
  7. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    If that were true there would be no need for the performer. We would only need to program such information into a computer and listen to the playback.

    Music contains sounds and feelings.
     
  8. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Everything is not necessarily written in the notation and meant to stand alone.

    Regarding the example given, it seems common to me to simply think of the last note (the 16th) as, rhythmically, coming as a pick-up note to the following downbeat. That shouldn't need anything more than a word or two if someone is having trouble placing and phrasing that note appropriately.

    There are other times when the written word is helpful ("lay back, hold back, play more triplet-y,") or whatever. (Poor word choices, sorry, ) My only point is that sometimes a written word or two is needed in conjunction with the musical notation to get closer to the appropriate rhythm.
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    There are several musical notations I don't like. One in particular is joining the same note, let's say Bb, when they are 8th notes and the intention is to sound a quarter note. It's in the measure, not across the bar. Why waste the ink (;-))? It clutters the measure (lets assume 4/4)? Always hate seeing that.
     
  10. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    A cheap cure would be to throw the term Rubato at everthing, but the actual interpretation is still up to the reader, and even that is still just a quick fix.
     

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