One shortcoming of Musical Notation

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetsplus, Jan 10, 2015.

  1. therealnod

    therealnod Pianissimo User

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    Yes, all the major programming languages are written in English. You have to use English to program. Many foreign programmers only know English through programming.
     
  2. Reedman1

    Reedman1 Piano User

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    But the languages themselves are not English... right? At least not the English we speak.
     
  3. therealnod

    therealnod Pianissimo User

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    At the very end of it all, there are two types; compiled and interpreted languages. Compiled languages get converted first to Assembly (which is an unrecognizable form of English) and then Binary, which is just 0s and 1s. Interpreted languages, such as the three or four (edit: programming) languages this very site is written in, does not go through this process directly. Hence, it's English. Just not the full vocabulary, unless you are a very strange programmer.
     
  4. Reedman1

    Reedman1 Piano User

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    Ah, well, there you go. I didn't know that, not being a programmer.

    Any more on the original topic of appearances being potentially misleading?
     
  5. therealnod

    therealnod Pianissimo User

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    I don't get how it would be misleading unless the proper instructions weren't present. If it's up to interpretation, it should be clearly stated in the score with notes for the conductor.
     
  6. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    ...or an Inform 7 programmer? ( Home : Inform )

    To address the original post, and Ivan's stated issue with phrases appearing connected on the paper while sounding separate when played - what I do is write the notes out separately without the bridging line -- so starting semi- and demi-semiquavers stand alone and not connected to the preceding note.

    --bumblebee
     
  7. therealnod

    therealnod Pianissimo User

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    I don't count frameworks, sorry.
     
  8. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I accept your apology ( don't do it again! :-) )

    I thought Inform 7 was a high level language which compiles down to a "bytecode"-like format similar to Java, to be executed by an engine/interpreter. I'd be interested in knowing your understanding of what constitutes a programming language, or what you mean by "framework", if you have the inclination to explain further (use PM if you would rather not send this thread any further away from the topic).

    --bumblebee
     
  9. Reedman1

    Reedman1 Piano User

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    Or demonstrate how code intended to,produce one result can produce a somewhat different result...;-)
     
  10. aborgman

    aborgman New Friend

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    This is somewhat present in English (and French and Spanish) as well - think of how using an "upward inflection" at the end of sentence turns it from a declarative statement to a question. It appears to be common in all languages that were spawned from Proto Indo-European.
     

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