Oompah music

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Kendall, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. Kendall

    Kendall Piano User

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    Hi,
    I wondered if any of you played in Oompah or Bavarian style bands? I'm keen to start one in my local area but am finding music quite hard to find although have found a very good site in Germany. I'm thinking 2 trumpets, 2 flugels, 2 tenor horn, trombone / baritone and e flat bass................... Hopefully I'll be able to drum up support from my like minded friends.

    Thanks in advance,
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Considering the venues of Bavarian bands, I'd opt for the tenor horns and delete the trombone, as the T-bone is also a tenor instrument. Too, I'm just curious as to why you select an Eb bass as opposed to BBb or CC. Honestly, I've never seen or played an Eb bass tuba. I did play an Eb alto horn for awhile. Still, you "make do" with whatever is available, I understand.

    Is Austrian / Bavarian music even favored in the area of England where you are?
     
  3. Sharvey

    Sharvey Pianissimo User

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    Lisa,

    From memory an arranger " E Siebert" did many arrangements with that om pah sound. I will have a look in our band library to see what is there. Talk to some of the older brass band players they will remember some of this style.


    Ed, many Australian and English brass bands woul have both Eb & Bb tubas. Their parts would often be different. I played Eb tuba for over twenty years.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The Hungry Five books (if still in print) are worth their weight in gold. Was sitting around in the Marching Band office and a panic call came in from the Special Olympics in a neighboring State, because their musical group canceled at the last minute. The band director handed me the phone, I looked around and saw we had enough guys for a quintet and said "sure." He handed us the Hungry Five books and we grabbed some stands and old ROTC Greatcoats and went to play. No warm up, no rehearsal, just a bunch of college kids sight-reading, and we played our butts off. Picture about a thousand Special athletes holding hands in big circles and happily dancing.

    I've played concerts in Paris and Japan and all that, but this was the greatest gig ever. Like I said, the Hungry Five books are worth their weight in gold. They even have jokes, too.
     
  5. Kendall

    Kendall Piano User

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    Hi,
    Thanks for that will have a google and see what turns up, I'll let you know how I get on :D
     
  6. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Oktoberfest gives a few months to rehearse it well. - plenty of good beer drinking buddies to join you. Good luck!!
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I looked at the onllne tuba sources and note many Ebs. Can't change the fact that I've never played one or now have the prospect of playing one. More, I was looking for why Lisa chose the Eb in her selection, putting aside that she may have one and has played one. Too, is such favored in the UK / "Bavarian" sound? In high school, it was a BBb and in college a CC that I played, the latter for my instrumental minor credits. As said prior, I'm a Sousa addict, but even I would score different parts between Eb and Bb rather than transpose one to the other.
     
  8. Kendall

    Kendall Piano User

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    Hi Ed,
    When I started my little brass adventure it was on e-flat bass which I was taught in treble clef (instead of bass clef in C) - to be honest it has had me at a disadvantage on occasion and while I can read bass clef - for the purposes of tuba playing I seem to think in treble clef and have never properly made that transition. Also most of my tuba playing experience has been in brass bands where we would generally have EEb and BBb basses (two of each usually) and these would be written in treble clef.

    Whether or not there will be a market for the Oompah sound I guess time will tell but if I can get a group of us together and its unpopular then we can go with other genres..........

    My thoughts are to get players for each instrument and I'm lucky in that I can adequately play any so I can slot in where we may have gaps - and if not I'd in all likelihood play trumpet/flugel or tenor horn...............
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Lisa, I think in my head I'm locked to a C (or concert keyed) instrument reading the low first bass line as a G and ascending, alternating line and space to the top line of the treble clef as an F. At one time I wondered why a conductor's score didn't just have 11 lines! In truth, this is what we are hearing regardless of what keyed instrument we play.

    My Mother was an elementary teacher special ed, and 1st & second grades, but she played piano IMO in concert quality and did tutor many young children on such. She also played 3 manual pipe organ in our church at times. Thus, I learned to sight read transposition of a lot of piano music to whatever instrument I'm playing which I still do as I've at least 15 songs written for piano/organ to every one written for another instrument in my library. Inclusive now in my music collection is songs my maternal Grandmother played on a parlor organ. I never found any my maternal Grandfather played on fiddle (violin) amd suspect he just played from piano music as well, but I could whistle a song and he could play it back ... more extensively.

    I didn't stand a chance of avoiding practice at home while growing up. At least once a week (sometime twice) I was privately tutored on trumpet by the same as my public school instructor/highschool band director, Walter H. Cameron. Surely, this is how I played in the high school band when I was only in 8th grade, but I wasn't the only 8th grader to do so, but it did surprise my late brother Bill who was then a Senior who played many of the school basses, which when he wasn't at home, I learned to play as well, and well enough that when needed, I was shifted from trumpet to play. Bill played the Sousaphone marching and Tuba in stage and concert band. I played the Sousaphone marching sometimes, but the tuba only once on stage in high school, but 4 times in college. These were both BBb instruments. Until 2 years ago, I had my own CC tuba but since I didn't aspire to play in a stage or concert band, I sold it. I haven't yet sold my slide trombone, but I seldom play it now whereas my slide isn't as accurate as it once was, in lieu thereof I play a euphonium which uses the same mouthpiece and covers the same range (and a bit more).

    I really like Bavarian music along with other Euro folk music, especially Gypsy and Israeli.

    Yep, one plays whatever genre the populace likes and here in rural NC such is Country, Blue Grass, and Gospel, which on a ten scale I can perform 7, 0, and 10 respectively on one or the other brass instruments. Can't position the brass sound in blue grass at all.

    Wish you success in your venture.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2013

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