Ovate Tuning Slide

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Kireduk., May 26, 2010.

  1. Kireduk.

    Kireduk. Pianissimo User

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    I've come into the market of buying a new horn and noticed that one I'm interested in has an ovate tuning slide, but it doesn't look like it goes as far down the leadpipe as it should. The Genesis by Getzen has a leadpipe that looks too short. I've compared it to the man who sports ovate tuning slides more than any other manufacturer, Dave Monette. Looking at his tpts and the Genesis, you can see where the Getzen's lacking. Now mind you, this one has an interchangeable tuning slide, so I guess if it's that far sharp, I could pull out the leadpipe a bit, but does that affect the playability much?

    Obviously I'm asking people who have played the Genesis before. I'm open to trumpeters with experience on the edwards generation x on the count they're basically the same instrument.

    Thanks,
    B.K.
     
  2. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

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    horns suit everybody differently. as the horn is a getzen, it is high quality, so it wont be out of tune. as fr how it plays, you should try it out yourself and see.
     
  3. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    The Getzen and Monette has different configurations.
    The Monette has a longer tuning slide part, while the Getzen has a longer bell part.

    The overall length of the horns from mouthpiecereceiver to bell flare
    will be pretty close to the same as they both are in the key of Bb.
     
  4. Kireduk.

    Kireduk. Pianissimo User

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    ah, I have learned something new about trumpets now. Hmm, I'm just wondering if it'll be so out of tune, I won't be able to pull out enough. I guess I'll just have to test it.
    Thanks.
     
  5. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

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    The reason a Bb trumpet's tuning slide is so long is to make it possible to tune it to an A trumpet. I'm the only person I know who has to do this on a regular basis. That's why I own so many horns. In our church, most of the songs have been transposed for guitar players. They seem to love the keys of A and E. That would put a Bb trumpet in the keys of B and F#. Or an A trumpet in the keys of C and G. If this doesn't apply to you, then don't sweat it.
     
  6. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    I wouldn't pull my tuning slide to make my trumpet in A unless I had a complete set of slides to convert it. Trumpets aren't meant to do that normally and pulling the MTS that far out will throw the tuning off for the entire scale of the instrument. F# and B aren't difficult keys, and the more you play them the easier they become.
     
  7. flugelgirl

    flugelgirl Forte User

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    The Genesis plays beautifully - best Getzen I've ever played! You should definitely try before you buy, though - I loved the way it played and it was very in tune, but it was far too dark for my needs.
     
  8. Kireduk.

    Kireduk. Pianissimo User

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    Thanks for the information.
    Indeed the Bb is not meant to play in A that way. I'm very comfortable playing in B and F# anyway. I'm saying that the tuning slide is able to be pulled out a little under an inch. Again, this was just the one I played, I was just wondering if any of the others are that way, it would seem by the design that they are all shorter.

    I had no way to know if the one I played was close to in tune or anything. If it stays close enough, the smaller slide won't bother me.

    Thanks for all the information everyone. Please feel free to tell me more.
     
  9. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

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    I think you may be confused between a C conversion set of slides and a typical Bb horn. To convert to C, which a full step higher, you need shorter slides. A is a half step flatter, which is easier to accomplish.

    You simply pull the 3rd slide out until it tunes, the first slide a little less until it tunes, and the 2nd slide is usually close enough. You don't have to believe me, just look at your Arban's. It will explain it in detail. Also, if you're playing in F# or B and aren't using your first and 3rd slides, you're probably playing out of tune any way.

    My main point is that the reason the main slide is so long is so that you can tune it to A if you want. That really is the reason. It used to be common practice in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Since that is no longer common, there's no reason to worry about a shorter tuning slide. Agreed?

    Also, I didn't mean to imply that I don't ever play in F# or B. It's just that some songs sound better with an A cornet or trumpet, so that's what I use.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2010
  10. Kireduk.

    Kireduk. Pianissimo User

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    I'm sorry if I seemed like I didn't believe you. I was just saying now a days, you wouldn't be caught dead doing that because of all the major advances that happened between the 19th century to present. What was professional quality in the sixties is considered intermediate today. It does mess with the sound, there is a certain sweet spot area in the tuning slide that makes the trumpet play at its best. It will play in A, but it won't play as good as it does in Bb.
     

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