Ovate Tuning Slide

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Kireduk., May 26, 2010.

  1. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    For those of you wrestling with altering a Bb to play in the key of A. Why not just learn to transpose? It isn't that tough if you work on it.
     
  2. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

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    My favorite horn is the 1952 Holton. If you look at my signature, you'll see that I only own one "modern" horn, the '90 Strad. It sounds great in any key. It's a beautiful, accurate, mechanical marvel of a machine. But it just doesn't have that crisp snappy sound of the Holton. Unfortunately, the Holton doesn't sound right to me in those funky keys. So I tune my cornet to A and I think it sounds better than when it's tuned to Bb. I go with what sounds best.

    But as far as my original point about the tuning slide: What I was trying to point out is that now a days, you don't need a long slide, since almost no one tunes to A any more. Except me. I didn't mean to hijack the thread by talking about my own quirky situation.
     
  3. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

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    Hey, tell me about it. I play an Eb peck horn, besides the Bb instruments, and sometimes I tune my cornet to A. I transpose so much that when I see music in my key I get confused.
     
  4. Kireduk.

    Kireduk. Pianissimo User

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    I love the holton sound too. Can't stand the Bach's though. I've tried, just never liked a thing about them.
    No worries about "hijacking the forum," I've already gotten the bulk of information I needed. You have helped me to understand why it is shorter.

    and to s. coomer: I have been worked extremely hard in transposing, my applied teacher is a stickler about it. But everyone has brain farts and sometimes reads the actual note than transposing, I do it plenty.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Back to the original question,
    you NEVER have to worry about a name brand company and basic tuning decisions. They build the horns to work with a broad range of players and trying to second guess the designers seems to be something that the geeks do for a living, it has never resulted in a design change by any manufacturer that I know of.

    If you are a decent quality player, all the decent horns on the planet will work just fine. Play testing them will let you find one that matches your eyes, brains and ears. Forget the design details. Out of the context of the whole instrument, they are meaningless. Ovate slides on a Monette are there for a different reason than on a Getzen. Bach has stuck with their D shaped slide in spite of all of the after market "wonderworkers".

    As far as not liking a Bach, I would be REALLY interested in doing some blind testing with you. I suspect that you would learn a WHOLE lot about yourself............... It ain't the gun. It is they that pull the trigger.
     
  6. revjames

    revjames Piano User

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    I have recently returned to playing after a very long break. I play in a church band but usually bass guitar. I sometimes play the trumpet if there is a piece that lends itself to a trumpet part. I usually look out for pieces in Bb, but this week there was a piece in A and I pulled the slide out and gave it a go and it seemed to work. I realsise there is no substitute for on the fly transposition but I'm not there yet.
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    That is crap. MAYBE the advertisers for the current manufacturers consider those professional horns from the 60's to be "intermediate today" but they could be biased.

    Turtle
     
  8. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

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    I thought EVERY piece lends itself to a trumpet part. If you tune to A, don't forget to pull the first and third slides out a bit to help keep it in tune. My cornet seemed to actually sound better tuned to A than Bb. It had rubber band stops on those slides to help keep them in place. Of course, the best solution would be to teach your guitar players to play flats...
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Kireduk sez,What was professional quality in the sixties is considered intermediate today.


    Boo Hiss!:thumbdown: :lol: Outside of custom horns, What was pro then is pro now. You have succumbed to "Manufacturers Marketing"! If that was true Kanstul would not be in the trumpet replication business, and doing quite well. I know people in the biz and to a person, they tell me not to get rid of what I have cause that don't make them that way anymore. Which do you think is better, a Strad from the 60's or one off the rack of your local music store? I have 2 Getzen Eterna's and guys with new "pro" horns love them both. Why? They are better than what they are playing. Sorry, they aren't for sale! ;-)
     
  10. revjames

    revjames Piano User

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    Anglesey, North Wales
    I'm right there with you on the 'every part lends it to a trumpet part' But the music director/ guitar player (also my wife) disagrees!

    I like the rubber band idea might try that. Guitar playing in flats not a problem as she uses a capo.
     

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