Performance Anxiety Solution?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bronxkid31415, Sep 30, 2015.

  1. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Thanks for the additional clarification Steve. I agree completely with you on this, and said so in my original reply.

    Mike
     
  2. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    No beta blockers here. In this case it's haldol 10 / lorazepam 2 / diphenhydramine 50. ;-)

    Mike
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The experience of Public speaking in Toastmasters eliminated any performance anxiety I have. Can't deny that Court appearances also helped to keep my foot out of mouth. Now I am what I am ... take it or leave.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    My feeling is that the stress of performance adds a physiological element that we can either call "fear" or "excitement." They both feel the same, although I've heard from one M.D. that the chemicals rushing through us are different for fear than excitement. Perhaps one of our tame doctors can chime in on that aspect.

    Chemicals aside, whether we perceive those visceral feelings as fear or excitement depends on our mindset. If we are well prepared, we have every right to feel excited and confident. If we are not prepared, we have every right to feel fear.

    The problem arises when we are well prepared, yet still feel fear and not excitement.
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I was told to "stick it in my ear" when I was trying to explain how awesome the mouthpieces are that Mark Curry makes. This was after the good doctor gave me a shot and had me answer some simple yes or no questions while hooked up to a bunch of electrodes....
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    In the medical profession, we call this procedure "Shake and Bake".
     
  7. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Over here we call it "routine enquiries"
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Pleasure, maybe, but stress and excitement as we are discussing in relationship to public performance are too closely related for the feedback mechanisms of the brain to distinguish. Anxiety under our control can evolve into excitement in which we see stressors as a positive as in a stage performance receiving applause (instead of stage fright) However, stress of any kind evokes the a response involving the following chain of events:


    The brain receives a stress response (good or bad)
    1. The hypothalamus releases corticotropin-releasing factor
    2. This releases adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) a pituitary gland under the hypothalamus
    3. ACTH travels by the blood stream to the adrenal glands
    4. The adrenal glands release cortisol and epinephrine into the bloodstream
    5. Cortisol and epinephrine work on cells (especially muscle and brain) to provide energy, oxygen,

    We can control the level of this response by reflecting the positiveness (or negativeness) of the physiological response. As our brain receives the feedback that the excitement is meaningful, activity is directed to more control that improves muscle performance optimizing the experience. This is what we call functional stress.

    If it spirals out into chaos, then the cardiovascular system takes the brunt of the energy force and we feel this (quit literally) in our gut. Abdominal pressure, dis-coordinated breathing...

    Stress can be looked upon as the spice of life. What makes one person sick will invigorate another... For me, I find performance before an audience invigorating as I focus the excitement on the music and the audience, not on my breathing and heart response. Keep the experience focused, keep the experience positive.
     
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  9. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    As I'm reading this thread, I now see a banner add for "Anxietin". Enough is enough! ;-)

    Mike

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    And learning how to control and channel that stress is key to handling pretty well any risk scenario.

    Just a couple that spring to mind:


    Telling a drunk aggressive sob to get on and do it or 'go forth and multiply'
    Explaining to an employer that if he insists on such-and-such then he signs all the documents personally
    Dealing with a contact lens malfunction while overtaking on a motorcycle in heavy traffic
    Keeping a steady arm when a 120 finish wins the match for your team, and your opponent only needs double 16
    Asking an attractive woman out on a date

    And I guess this goes all the way back to the days our ancestors took on something big, angry yet tasty with a pointy stick.

    It doesn't take strength (or drugs), it takes mindset.
     

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