Piccolo Trumpet, Cornetto and Baroque Music

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SmoothOperator, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    I have been playing the Cornetto, and its sound reminds me very much of the piccolo trumpet. I got to doing some research and it seems the piccolo trumpet is used in for baroque arrangements. I am wondering, is does the four valve piccolo trumpet use pedal tones similar to a cornetto?
     
  2. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Where did you buy yours? I've always wanted one but can't seem to find any cheap "student model" cornettos! They're all like $1000+ and I can't justify buying one :(
     
  3. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    I carved mine :). There is a thread with a picture.

    http://www.trumpetmaster.com/vb/f131/my-cowboy-trumpet-cornetto-66258.html

    It has taken weeks to get anything out of it tone wise. I found a craftsman in my local town that has been working with me lathing different mouthpieces, and just charges for the machine time. He made a mouthpiece that had a rim diameter closer to my trumpet, and all the sudden I could recognize the tone, then I went back to the small acorn style and I could get a similar tone, before I was starting to wonder if mine was even playable. It was just much different technique. Now I am wondering if playing a cornetto would translate to a four valve piccolo? It seems that they would have about the same range, if the piccolo trumpets used pedal tones.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Most piccolo trumpet don't respond well on the pedal tones--they are there, but don't have the same focus.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The pedal tone of a picc is not required for baroque music. As VB shared, it is generally out of tune and out of character with all of the other notes on the horn.

    The cornetto is mostly used in its first two octaves from low G/A to g/a on top of the staff. The picc is used a half octave higher. If you are using the "recommended" acorn style mouthpiece for the cornetto, its sound differs considerably from a picc. The ability to modulate the tone of a cornetto is much greater. It is almost possible to "speak".

    The less expensive resin cornettos by Christopher Monk are indeed in short supply. I think the waiting list is a year. Occasionally one pops up on EBay.
     
  6. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    I have been thinking about seeing if my friend with the lathe that has been making mouthpieces and primitive horns( out of yak horn ) to see if he would be interested in making a whole cornetto. What do you think the price point is? For cornetto digri, a straight cornetto but with a separate mouthpiece ( as opposed to the curved cornetto or a straight cornetto with a non detachable mouthpiece ), it might be easier to manufacture. I think I would have to advise him on the placement and tuning of the tone holes, but he has been reading my copy of the "Amateur Wind Instrument Maker", and might have some ideas about how to construct them. For example he seems to think that a water resistant epoxy would show off the wood grain so that leather binding wouldn't be necessary.
     
  7. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    While a straight cornetto or zink is easier to make, I'd advise sticking with the curved form. I have a Moeck that I bought new several years ago, and neither I nor my daughter (an oboist) can play the thing comfortably - there's a particularly nasty gap between a couple of the finger holes that requires a very large or very flexible hand to cover. With arthritis, I can't begin to play the thing for more than a couple of minutes at a time.
     
  8. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    After playing my straight one for a month or two, it isn't a problem, though in the beginning I did have to think about the ergonomics of it quite a bit so as not to hurt myself, but in the end it is like playing guitar stretching the pinky or ring finger to get that extra fret. The difference in price could be substantial, and it seems straight cornetto are not uncommon, maybe because people aren't using the corner of the mouth to play anymore.
     
  9. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    I have a straight cornetto from John McCann. Because of small hands I had a problem reaching the last finger hole. I had a friend who is a repair tech put a clarinet key on the last hole along with a clarinet thumb rest for the right hand.
     
  10. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Something I have been wondering is why there isn't a more modern version of the cornetto. I imagine it would look like a narrow soprano saxophone, but with a brass trumpet like mouthpiece instead of a reed. Of course part of the fun is the simplicity, but it seems that it would fill a niche in the brass family, being able to play a full octave without enharmonics.
     

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