Piccolo trumpet mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Mouthpieces / Mutes / Other' started by GordonH, Sep 9, 2005.

  1. GordonH

    GordonH Mezzo Forte User

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    May 15, 2005
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    Hello Manny,

    I have always played on smaller mouthpieces for piccolo trumpet compared to Bb/C/D. However, my new teacher is suggestingI stick to the same rim. This worries me because I am using the Monette 1-5 rim.
    Do you think thats workable for piccolo trumpet?
    If so, do you know how the AP1-5 and AP1-5L compare?
    What is the difference between them?

    Thanks

    Gordon
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
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    Gordon,

    I would assume that the one danger in the L series mouthpieces is the potential for bottoming out. I don't know if you're familiar with that expression we use here but essentially is getting too much lip in the mouthpiece and having that stop the vibrations.

    I'm not hesitant to go to a slightly smaller rim for piccolo whereas some people are religious about keeping it the same.

    ML[/i]
     
  3. GordonH

    GordonH Mezzo Forte User

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    Ok, so the L series are shallower?
    Thats helpful, I don;t really like shallow mouthpieces.

    I have always used a smaller mouthpiece, but he says that switching like that is not helping my embouchre stability (which is the root of my reliability problem).
    I might get an AP 1-5 and see if it works.

    I am working on the Schlossberg daily drills and they are certainly helping my embouchre.
    Its my bottom lip that has much less strength than my top lip and I am trying to get both of them built up a bit.

    By the way, the teacher recently changed to Monette mouthpieces after visiting a former student in Singapore.
    he had been sceptical till he had the time off to play around with one and he says he will never go back to Bach.
    He knows what he is talking about as he is a top player here and fro an extremely conservfative background equipment wise.
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Yeah, Gordon, the L stands for Lead like a lead player in a big band. It took a little "auditioning" before I could find what worked for me.

    Now, I understand you don't like the shallower pieces. I will say that you must then take care that the mouthpiece you select has the best intonation inthe upper register. Often, I have found that the deep mouthpieces on piccolo have a flat upper reg. and I feel that somewhat defeats the purpose of a good piccolo.

    As part of my test when checjking out a potential mouthpiece is a couple of scales principally the two octave F major. Then I go upward in half steps and check for the "bottoming out" and the ease of pitch on the uper notes. It all depends on what you're going to use it for, Brandenburgs or Hallelujah Choruses.

    Again, good luck.

    ML
     
  5. GordonH

    GordonH Mezzo Forte User

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    Thanks Manny
    I will bear that in mind.
     
  6. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    I have been looking for a picc. mouthpiece for a long time. One of the reasons that I don't go with a shallow one is I think that they go sharp in the upper register.

    I guess I have to get one some where in the middle.
     
  7. GordonH

    GordonH Mezzo Forte User

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    I played on a Bach 6 for years which is very deep but was comfortable and played in tune well.

    I think if you have a lot of lip intrusion in the cup you can use a deeper mouthpiece without it feeling as deep.
     
  8. GordonH

    GordonH Mezzo Forte User

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    May 15, 2005
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    Update:

    Had not touched the piccolo for a week while I have been doing HL CLark and Schlossberg and trying to improve my breathing (and reduce pressure).

    I tried the pic after my Bb practicing with a 1C mouthpiece and it actually did make an eaier change.
    The upper register was OK and it all seemed in tune.
    I feel it might be hard work in a big piece like one of the Bach or Handel oratorios (a common gig for trumpet players in the UK).

    Time will tell, but if I am still getting on with it in a weeks time I will think about a monette AP1-5
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous Forte User

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    Oct 21, 2003
    I use a Bach 3C with a 25/117. It works great for almost anything I could ask for. Even on Brandenburg it's great for me. The upper register is fairly easy and surprisingly enough, it's not flat. Although, knowing the Bach level of consistency, maybe it's a 5C...or a 12C. Ha!
     
  10. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Aug 11, 2005
    Atlanta, GA
    Piccolo mouthpiece

    I used a Bach 10 1/2 C for the longest time on piccolo (Yamaha Custom long-bell). Many players I asked while searching for my own piece were Bach 1 or 1 1/2 mouthpiece players on their big horns. (Larry Knopp, Charlie Geyer) When they all told me they played a 10 1/2C, I was not too thrilled. I thought it would be way too much of change for me and way too small. Well, I was wrong. It seems as though that particular rim size fits harmoniously "into" an embouchure that is accustomed to playing on a Bach 1 rim. In otherwords, the center stays in the center between switching. At least this is my guess. For me, it is very comfortable to go back and forth between them. On my big horns I play a custom Stork (2C+26C) which is VERY close to a Bach 1 (which I played all my adult life) and my piccolo counterpart (which is VERY close to a Bach 10 1/2 C) is a 7P. This works for just about anything. If I really need volume on the piccolo, perhaps with a piece like Pictures at an Exhibition, I use a Bach 3D. 99% of the time though, I am playing piccolo in chamber orchestra or solo settings and the 7P is fine.
     

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