Pictures of my Vintage Olds - 1962 (requires broadband)

Discussion in 'Vintage Trumpets / Cornets' started by the chief, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. the chief

    the chief Pianissimo User

    66
    0
    Feb 9, 2004
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    First I was gonna sell it, now I'm keeping it. Then I was gonna get it re-lacquered, but I think I'll leave that alone and just get a few dents taken out. Plays great.
     
  2. NYTC

    NYTC Forte User

    1,137
    4
    Nov 1, 2004
    Brooklyn,NY
    Very nice horn.Keep it.
     
  3. pwillini

    pwillini Pianissimo User

    134
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    Mar 4, 2004
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Is that a Mendez or Opera?
     
  4. dave_59

    dave_59 New Friend

    36
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    Jan 12, 2005
    its a recording isnt it.
    dave
     
  5. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

    801
    1
    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    It's a very nice Recording. From the engraving, I'd say either a Los Angeles, or maybe an early Fullerton.
     
  6. the chief

    the chief Pianissimo User

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    Feb 9, 2004
    It's a Recording from Fullerton.
     
  7. dave_59

    dave_59 New Friend

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    Jan 12, 2005
    are the la horns better than the early fullertons. I think there is a view (some people), that all fullertons are inferior to the LA horns, because of the 1970's horns which were notably poor being made at fullerton.
    dave
     
  8. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

    801
    1
    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    Yeah, that's a common view, but not 100% accurate. Yes, the LA's are more valuable, but the Fullertons are good too. Up until around the 1970's. At this point, quality control went down the drain. They still made a few good horns, but they weren't as consistent. My dad has a 1969 Ambassador. It's a good horn. Nothing on my LA Studio, mind you, but it's a good horn.
     
  9. fatpauly

    fatpauly Pianissimo User

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    Nov 11, 2003
    Ellicott City, Maryland
    Chief -

    Beautiful Recording. Great horn. If it plays as nice as it looks, you will not regret keeping it.

    I have a 1968 Recording trumpet and a 1954 Recording cornet, and these are at the top of my collection for looks, sound and playability.

    You might reconsider holding off on getting these restored/relaquered. I sent mine off to Charlie Melk in the fall and he did a wonderful job getting these back to prime condition. Here is a before/after shot of the cornet:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Not the best pictures, but I think you get the idea. As much as you love your Recording now, you will not believe how great it can look after Charlie has gone over it!

    - Paul Artola
    Ellicott City, Maryland
     
  10. the chief

    the chief Pianissimo User

    66
    0
    Feb 9, 2004
    Paul

    I did email Charlie Melk about having work done on it. At the very least I'll probobly have him remove a couple small dents. To get the horn relacquered would cost a bit more, and I've heard it decreases the value of the horn.

    I question whether that's true or not, but eventually it will come down to how I want the horn to look. I wouldn't mind having my Recording look brand new...at a grand total investment of around $1000. Then I can turn around and sell it on ebay for $1800 ;-)


    By the way, some would say that the Recordings all they way through the 70's were equally as good as the previous years and that it was only the Ambassador line that suffered bad quality control. I guess the only compormise ever made with the Recording model was the engraving on the bell, which was replaced by a machine in the later years. Seeing as how my horn is a 62', I think it falls well within the boundaries of the 'safe-zone', in any case.

    I don't remember the year that Olds moved from LA to Fullerton, but the Super Recording was Olds' top-of-the line horn, and when it was replaced by the Recording around 1950, it continued to remain the top-horn until the Mendez was released.

    Please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.
     

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