Plastic

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Churchman, Oct 2, 2014.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Actually I have no issues with plastic, wood, glass or ice. Been there, done that.

    To me, this step is logical. Someone has identified a possible market where they can get OLLT (objects looking like trumpets) into the hands of more kids than would be possible with metal horns. If the concept flies, there will be a "WallMart Avenger" OLLT blister packed for $59.95 within 5 years. Grandmothers and aunts looking for a cheap birthday gift for their musical relatives will buy them with no further thoughts - like all of those cheap miniature keyboards that have no use except to make noise.

    My interest in a Tromba or pTrumpet is not affected by this "development". I am not looking for the lowe$t common denominator.

    If Alison had used the pTrumpet at her night of the proms concert, I would have been really impressed. With the marketing video, the event was reduced to "$€X $€LLS"!
     
  2. FireandAir

    FireandAir Pianissimo User

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    So you think they picked her because she's a hot blonde and not because they are a British company that would naturally want to get an endorsement from the dominant British trumpet virtuoso in the world today, and one that has made school music education a central part of her charitable activity to boot? I doubt she'd have done it if she felt like she was being used as a booth babe, and they probably could have gotten some hottie in a short skirt for a lot cheaper.

    An instrument like this isn't just a toy for kids. Made well and robustly, it's also a potential boost for poor and working-class musicians, of which I was one myself for many years. Growing up in what we'll gently refer to as a financially struggling household, no instrument at all was a possibility for me until I was 11 years old, and only because it was a total junker that my parents got for free. If this thing behaves well, ages well, and is inexpensive enough to make music-making a possibility for anyone who otherwise can't manage it, I'm all for it.

    And plastic doesn't mean cheap Walmart blister-pack crap automatically. One can always skimp or not on proper materials and machining, or quality control. If a five-year old ptrumpet still sounds good and stands up to the rigors of school music programs, I see zero problem with it whatsoever. I hope we can start 3-d printing them eventually. I hope we can get good musical instruments that behave well into the hands of anyone who wants them, frankly.

    And in five years, if you -- not rhetorical you, but you specifically -- can tell a ptrumpet from a decent brass student trumpet in a blind listening test, I'll buy you a steak dinner. The music world has been through this nonsense already with new versus old violins, and the blind listening tests fall on the side of "no difference" as predictably as the sunrise.
     
  3. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You have a lot of "ifs" in your view.

    I am not concerned with Alisons playing, endorsement, the comparison of the current qulity of plastic instrument compared to what "could be" in the future, or the prospect of a free steak when you lose the "bet".

    Fact is, plastic is the domain of companies that can crank out the mass to pay for the tooling. Once the tooling is created, the OLLT is defined. Unfortunately, the odds are with me. Look what has happened in other industries: has HiFi really advanced in the last 20 years? What about automobiles, when we compare longevity, cost of ownership (not just fuel consumption or safety), What about the quality of homes?

    Plastic trumpets are not here as a development of the state of the art. Plastic was not chosen because of sonic or musical properties. COULD a plastic trumpet scratch the state of the art? I read at the website Goodsoundclub.com that only barbaric results are possible in the hands of barbarians. I truly believe this. The OLLT needs an artist to bring it to an acceptable level.

    Plastic will only be truly cheaper than brass if they can crank out enough quantity. Once the market is built, the price will represent the "value" to the player, not reflect its manufacturing cost. A good plastic OLLT will cost the same as a brass trumpet in a similar quality level.

    We are not dealing with commercial dreams to advance the art form. That is why I am confident that the OLLT will not challenge more traditional designs and manufacturing methods when we talk about what professionals use.

     
  5. Churchman

    Churchman Mezzo Piano User

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    If it was thirty english quids then I'd go out and get one, use it for taking places in the boot when I want to practice, and never worry about the fact that it isn't metal, and won't work like a good horn. Because if it broke (not dentable, so unmendable) I could pick up another. And before you get all angsty... metal and plastic do not have the same physical properties, this will never 'be' a trumpet, it will only ever look like one. Maybe, now that the whole world is apparently becoming obese, it could be a plumpet.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    In many areas of life, plastic and its derivatives HAVE made a reasonable contribution to the state of the art.
    Teflon and Polyurethane are two very fine examples in their respective areas of use. The resin to make fiberglass or carbon fibre parts is also a polymer. Mobile telephones are plastic, light and still durable.

    The idea of a trumpet with interchangeable skins does not appeal to me however...........
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Alison Balsom or the plastic trumpet?
     
  8. mgcoleman

    mgcoleman Mezzo Forte User

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    Obviously the trumpet - said it was for his granddaughter....but I get your drift.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Maybe the granddaughter would share?
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    With me.
     

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