playing behind a vocalist

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by songbook, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. songbook

    songbook Piano User

    272
    54
    Apr 25, 2010
    Wow! great advise by all. Just wondering if there were certain notes of the scale that some of you use more than others? I know my chords and scales, but wonder if certain notes were more important than others.
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,420
    7,545
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    In the band I am in, D above high C is always a kicker at the end of the song. It was the last note after an 1.5 hr Easter celebration. Of course it was a birds-eye note held forever, drum kick, fff kick to end it. I looked like this :stars::stars::stars:! BUT I did it without a frack/crack at all. Really depends on the genre you're playing. Most church music is for guitars, so the more sharps the better!! Although I just played a piece where the "composer" put in a 2 bar section in Gb instead of F#. The rest of the piece was in F and G. Go figure (maybe it is one of those proper notation thingamabob's).
     
    tedh1951 likes this.
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,460
    7,037
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    I usually avoid 4ths and 7ths, but with a normal 1,3,5 chord adding a 6th or a 9th can add pleasant tension.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,129
    9,306
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Listen to her, answer her (in the spaces she provides), and only when invited, harmonize with her. I also find a harmon mute really adds texture and places you more in the background so you do not even need to worry about overshadowing.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,129
    9,306
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Look for the ii,v,i pattern, and play i scale over this patturn (bleed into a few notes with a flatted third or try to slip in a ii,v,i pattern from Donna Lee). When you see a + in the cord, play around whole note scale tones (there are only 2 whole not scales to learn), and when you see a -5, play the diminished cord (add -3).

    Do this and the singer will drool all over you and ask you back for more! And if she doesn't, give her to me!
     
  6. trumpetman41

    trumpetman41 Pianissimo User

    67
    2
    Feb 17, 2009
    Omaha, NE
    When backing up a vocalist, keep in mind that mutes can be your best friend. What effect are you striving for. What are the other musicians doing? One bad note from you will screw up a vocal performance. You are the shadow in the song, not the sun.....
     
  7. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

    5,242
    1,791
    Nov 7, 2009
    San Pedro
    +a lot to gmonady
    I like to mimic the vocalist rhythmically but play a harmony (ie third above) as an echo during pauses ... I wouldn't play the same notes as an echo very often ..
    but I really like tobylou8's idea high D fortissimo
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,460
    7,037
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
  9. Branson

    Branson Piano User

    486
    141
    Jan 16, 2011
    A cup mutes always sounds good behind a girl singer. If you would like to know WHAT to play, listed to tailgate trombone players (Dixieland) as they phrase behind the trumpet lead and use their styling behind your vocalist.
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,420
    7,545
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
    Vulgano Brother likes this.

Share This Page