Playing (Buzzing) on the Mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tedh1951, May 4, 2015.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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  2. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    When trying to explain why I did not buzz on the mouthpiece to a friend I was smartly put in my place by "better players than you buzz on their mouthpieces".:D

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Ouch!
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Oh, and that would include the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra Trombone line? All except this one musician I'd guess?

    I wonder how the subject matter in the link could be explained then?
     
  5. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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  6. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    To Buzz or not to Buzz, that is the question. (William Shakespear paraphrased). I have asked several of my trumpet playing friends "How does the trumpet work?", the most common answer I get is "The trumpet amplifies the buzzing of the lips". While we do not need to understand the physics and mathematics involved in the analyses of the instrument to make music, the basic understanding of resonance and the concept of relaxed lips and the feeling of the reaction of the reflections within on the lips has made an enormous difference to my playing, greatly increased endurance, increased range and better tone.

    I used to do a lot of free and mouthpiece buzzing on my 100 km drive to band with no seemingly benefit, I have abandoned them altogether. At 77 I need to make it as easy as possible.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  7. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    It's not what happens at the little end, or the sound that comes out the big end, but the wiggly bits in the middle I have trouble with.
     
  8. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Piano User

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    Like pedal tones, the pencil trick etc I think the usefulness of mouthpiece buzzing varies from player to player and, given that, generalizations are difficult to make
     
  9. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    From the master himself, Adolph Herseth, as taken from Tim Kent's notes.

    Practice on the mouthpiece every day before your regular session. Walk around and play anything musical (no drills) from excerpts to pop tunes. Concentrate on being very musical on these pieces, and most important, on a very LARGE SOUND on the mouthpiece.

    The mouthpiece, because of the lack of divisions, it is possible to go over all ranges, and it forces you to use your ear. Also in emergency situations, it can be used as a substitute for regular practice on the horn.

    Play a complete session on the mouthpiece once in a while. This keeps you from getting hangups on the horn, and improves everything from sound to articualtion.
    Whenever you are having problems on any piece, play it on the mouthpiece.

    Rich T.
     
  10. limepickle

    limepickle Piano User

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    I don't buzz on the mouthpiece regularly, but I do it when playing is not an option. It does a good job of keeping the chops in shape.

    I have to say that my experience does not reflect the experience of the man in this video. When I buzz on the mouthpiece and put it into the horn, it seamlessly turns into a solid sound on the horn. In fact, I just tried it. I match with him on playing on the trumpet and then pulling it out to hear no sound on the mouthpiece alone, but that transition is so awkward that I wouldn't put too much weight on it. If anything, the bad sound that he gets when going from mouthpiece buzzing to playing the horn is probably just from having to physically adjust to the playing characteristics of the trombone.

    There are so many good players and so many idiosyncrasies to go with them. It's too bad when good players give these types of tips and those receiving them take them to be universally true. In this case especially, he shouldn't be drawing this conclusion, because the "experiment" isn't really done well. He didn't account for the fact that the pitch doesn't line up perfectly from mouthpiece to trombone, which would obviously cause his sound to waver. The reverse part of playing and then pulling the mouthpiece out is too problematic to draw any conclusions. Fortunately, it seems that not too many people in the comments are taking this as gospel.
     

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