Playing inspirational & Christian music.......how do you react to applause??

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by guitarsrmine, Oct 27, 2011.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,791
    3,555
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Jimmy, you raise an interesting point. This is something that continues to come up in discussion with the kind of music I play in church, which is contemporay Christian rock - Chris Tomlin, Matt Redman, Steve Fee, Casting Crowns, Israel Houghton, etc. To add to that, I'm not a trumpet player for that - I'm a drummer. In the churches where I play, there is applause but I'd like to think that the applause that is given is two-fold. The first part is that the congregation enjoyed the rendition of whatever it was we just played, but it's also praise to God because he's the one who puts it all together.

    Regarding the entertainment aspect, I think that in a modern church there is a disconnect between what is ideal and the reality of the situation, which is that aside from being a place of worship, it's also a business of sorts, and in order to keep the business running you have to keep your customers, i.e., the congregation, happy. Add to it that people are basic creatures and we want to be entertained, and that's why contempory worship with a rock band configuration has become so popular - it's what we relate to in this modern age. I've always felt that the ends justify the means - if a rocking worship band is what is bringing people in the door and keeping them there, then I don't see the issue with it.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    Trick G, your last was what I might call a treatise, albeit so short, but very good on the subject of this thread. I'll not let my personal feelings confront this in any way, still I'm a traditionialist viz not very modern in what I expect in the church sanctuary, or modern-jazzy in over 90% of my entire personal repertoire when playing anywhere. If I were to play with a group, it would be their book, not mine, that I would play. Still, our church holds many public community dances in their fellowship hall as a fund raiser for the church. Sadly, most of these are DJ'd, but one or two now and then have a combo providing the music, and all seem reasonably attended or at least profitable. The last was a hoe-down / barn dance that exceeded occupational space capacity of 350. The Willy Peebles Band is booked for the next, I'm told.

    Well, it's splitso now for me to get back to a meeting upstairs in our lawyers office.
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,459
    7,035
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    A traditional symphony orchestra's Music Director shares with Pastors and counselors the need to make people listen to things they don't want to hear sometimes--to teach them.

    If entertainment is a function of the church, or the church musician, then somebody please direct me to the nearest Hooter's-style church.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,791
    3,555
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    To add to this just a bit and to toss out some food for thought, let's not forget that the music that we now consider to be "traditional" was considered contemporary at the time it was written. Why should we hold on to that old tradition, cranking out hymns and other literature that is hundreds of years old when those who originally wrote that music had no intention of sticking to what was at that time considered to be "traditional?" They moved with the times and they wrote and played the music of their time, utilizing the instrumenation of their time, so why should it be considered wrong for us to do the same? And are we really to believe that some of those works weren't written with a performance/entertainment value in mind? Handel took the Messiah on tour and did concerts with it for goodness sakes! Yet, here we are, cranking out various portions of it for our Easter and Christmas special services becuase it's considered to be "traditional" liturgical repertoire.

    Again, I'm not trying to stir the pot - just putting out some food for thought.
     
  5. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

    4,808
    2,997
    Dec 19, 2009
    Hillsborough, NJ
    I have to admit, you have some great points here. One of the Evangelists in the 1800's I believe used the tunes to the popular saloon and bar songs with Christian words so people could relate to them and know the tune so they could feel comfortable singing them! That might meet with some opposition nowadays in some churches I'm afraid.
    I like the traditional in spite of all this, though. Doesn't mean I have to condemn everyone who differs in their opinion.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,459
    7,035
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    When I consider the German Liedgut there are treasures there dating back to the 12th Century. They've kept the good ones. What I find in modern hymnals in America is for the most part a combination of schmaltz and college fight songs. I think contemporary church music in America grew out of a need for something different.

    My Music History professor, William Brandt, said that pioneer composers found a new space, others followed, and when things reached a certain point, other composers would decide they needed more "elbow room." Consider Baroque music, which became more and more florid until it became Rococo, and then the style switched to Classical. Beethoven single-handedly brought the Classical to the Romantic period. So on and so on.

    Could it be that people applaud Praise and Worship bands not for the performance, but rather than they are grateful not to have to sing those schmaltzy or college fight song tunes?

    Other food for thought.
     
  7. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

    784
    102
    Sep 25, 2009
    Polson, MT
    Boy, I could write a sermon on this topic. I just might. First of all, if you're playing for the applause and not for Christ or the edification of His church, go somewhere else. Second, if your church discourages applause, they're guilty of false humility, which is the worst form of pride. Applause means "thank you", nothing more, nothing less. A thankful heart is basic to your walk of faith, whether you're thanking the Creator or the creature who worships Him. I've been on worship teams and on stage. To not acknowledge applause is to lack humility. Always bow. That is true humility. It's your way of saying, "you're welcome". And always always make sure that everything you do is for Him. I've led more people to Christ in bars than I ever have in church.
     
  8. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

    784
    102
    Sep 25, 2009
    Polson, MT
    Okay, here I go again. You'll probably be okay with your motives, as long as you remember one thing. There really is only one Person in the audience.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,791
    3,555
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Oh I'm not condemning anyone. To the contrary in fact - I think there is plenty of room, and a time and a place for both. I cut my teeth as a gigging musician by doing Baroque works at the Lutheran church in my hometown when I was just 17 and I've continued to work as a liturgical trumpet player through the years at Christmas and Easter. In some ways I think that what we now consider to be traditional worship music is much more reverent and can be equally as energizing and moving as contemporary worship. Having said that, it has to be done well and you have to be in the right setting with the right congregation. My comments were simply to point out that as times change it's ok to bring a contemporary style to church music if that's what it takes to resonate with the congregation. To add to that and bring it back to the subject of the thread, as someone else already mentioned, applause is how people say thank you, both to the musicians providing the music, and to the God to whom they are practicing their faith.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2011
  10. guitarsrmine

    guitarsrmine Piano User

    270
    71
    Dec 29, 2008
    Franklin, Pa
    Thanks for everyones input.....I didnt think it would(the original post) last this long. After I've done a solo, I usually just walk off, usually with a smile, and if someone wants to comment later Ill say thanks. I do have a friend who sings in church, and does nursing homes alot too, and Im sometimes aghast(?) at his "Vegas" type of attitude......and in church,no less!!! I try to be humble(which I am) and NEVER make it seem like its about me!!!
     

Share This Page