playing linked to depression?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by broazny, Oct 14, 2015.

  1. broazny

    broazny New Friend

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    Aug 31, 2014
    Trumpet playing is like a drug for me, even though is bad for me I still do it. I still remember the day when I thought I was the ****. However, that quickly changed when I found out my chair, last chair. my teacher would always yell at me, and I began practicing like crazy. I would dedicate 1 hour everyday, and started lessons. After listening to myriad trumpet players, I felt like I wanted to play trumpet for a living. But looking back, I haven't improved at all, lessons only really helped me on reading and technique. I would do the bill adams routine everyday with no results. I sound ****. the amount of time I dedicate to playing isn't helping at all. listening isn't helping at all. All the underclassmen sound better than me. Is it time to take a break? I feel like trumpet playing isn't good for me, but I still love the trumpet.
     
  2. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    If you love it, then enjoy it. If you feel the trumpet is not good for you, then stop playing.

    If you suck at it, and enjoy it, then play and enjoy it. Play the best you can when you play and practice.
    If you suck at it, and you don't know it - then maybe ask your teacher where he rates you. Don't delude yourself, but don't judge by your chair. The last chair is a good place to start. Playing in any band, in any chair is where the fun of making music starts.

    At least you know that the others play better than you. If you want to make a living from it, then maybe this is not the instrument for you, but give it your best - I really don't understand how playing it can make you depressed. It should be a lift...

    Maybe look at what you really enjoy.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The trumpet is a demanding instrument. To progress, you must have a passion for the horn. If you don't it will be a painful road to try to keep up.

    So, if you have the passion to play this horn and have set goals to achieve for the future (with no time demands on when you will achieve these goals, then keep with it, and welcome to TM.

    If you don't have the passion, do yourself a great favor, stop playing the trumpet, at it was nice knowing you for the short time you were here on TM.
     
  4. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    Firstly, stop being a potty mouth.

    Secondly, find some guys who want to play with you outside of school, they should be players who sound like you want to sound. Two things will happen: you'll have to get better to keep up and eventually you'll get the sound you want. It's like trying to beat your 1-rep max on deadlift. You don't quit pulling because it's "too hard" even though you pulled ten pounds less at your last meet, you keep pulling and your body moves a bit, subtly, then all the parts are in the right place to finish the lift. The same thing happens with your sound. You emboucher changes to get you the sound you want.

    Thirdly, practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. There are very few people honest enough with themselves to know when they've reached "perfection", and judging about how you say you thought you were "the s***" and ended up eating humble pie, you dont seem to be one of those people, so get a good instructor.

    Third chair isnt that bad. When I was in high school, I once axt my director why he "demoted" me from playing some first parts on a couple of numbers. His response was that he needed me on second for the ones I axt about because needed a strong player to bring the fullness of the sound pyramid and lead the younger players. Look at this as an opportunity to put aside your ego.
     
  5. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    What these guys said.

    Additionally, you might need another teacher. I had chop problems in college that two successive teachers could not solve. Looking back on it (and because I've pretty much solved those former problems), I realize that the big problem was, well, my teachers could not solve my problems - which were solvable.

    I am one of those people who does believe that there are some who just can't make music, and that there are those who can do it easily. Most of us fall in the middle. But you just could be one who can't. It's not for me to say and I don't want to discourage you, but that's one reason I mention getting another teacher s/he might be able to give you hope or the door, whereas your present instruction doesn't seem to be giving you either.
     
  6. Culbe

    Culbe Forte User

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    Normal
    You can't move up if you're in first chair.
     
  7. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    There's always room for improvement and there are always routes for upward movement.
     
  8. Culbe

    Culbe Forte User

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    Yes, but last chair is a great place to start, as Peter said. Start there, and work up.
     
  9. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Ditto. It doesn't make you cool; it makes you look inarticulate, and it doesn't follow TrumpetMaster guidelines.
     

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