playing linked to depression?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by broazny, Oct 14, 2015.

  1. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Inner parts are very important. Just ask any conductor.

    A friend of mine who played lead on the Woody Herman Band told me of a guy in the band who just played section. And that he had a reputation of being one of the strongest section players in the business. So he got respect and work.

    In one of my bands in Germany, there was a woman who played 2nd and 3rd and didn't even want the chance to play 1st on easier parts. That was her thing and she played those parts for, I guess now, decades.

    And singing praises of the inner parts to a student who's playing them in terms of their necessity, is probably what one needs to do if that player is not going to progress.

    But given all of that, I still don't think the 2nd and 3rd parts are ones to which one should aspire.
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    I also went through a bit of a plateau recently. So I decided I had to do something serious about how I practise. No guarantees but this has worked for me big time over the last few months.

    Download Audacity (freeware), and invest in a decent microphone and mixer unit so you can make a quality recording of yourself. Also download a decent metronome.

    Start with the first section of Arban, record an exercise at a slowish metronome speed, then play it back to yourself noting every single missed centre, tonal wobble, clunky attack, missed note etc etc. Really put it under the microscope until you're clear in your mind which notes and articulations require extra concentration.

    Then record yourself again, at a slower metronome speed if necessary. If there is an improvement then save the recording to computer for future reference.

    Continue repeating the exercise, only saving the recording when you've heard a genuine improvement, until either you've spent 20 minutes on it or made at least 3 improved recordings.

    Then move on to the next section of Arban and do the same thing with the first exercise there.

    Continue until you have worked on at least one exercise from EVERY section.

    Most important - Warm down with one of the easy exercises that you thought was 'beneath you'. But record that one also, and listen to it really intently. Are there any improvements you can make to that one? Save it anyway for future reference.

    The next day, split your time between working on the exercises you did yesterday, and where you genuinely feel you've done as best you can, up the metronome speed a bit or move on to the next exercise.

    If you find you're having a bit of a rough day and are struggling to match yesterday's standard, just put in a bit of time making recordings of some easy stuff you'd not got around to recording or just didn't 'perfect' the last time you looked at it.


    The key things about this approach are:

    1) Everyday, no matter how you feel, you're recording at least something better than ever before.
    2) You're missing out no aspect of proper technique development. And you will find that working on sections that you've avoided in the past will ignite your performance at 'sticking points' in other sections.
    3) It automatically steers you toward working on the areas you need to be working on.
    4) It automatically steers you toward the appropriate level of difficulty for most rapid progress.
    5) It forces you to concentrate and critically analyse what you're doing rather than just going through the motions.

    And speaking of 'motions', posting a few recent recordings will give us a much better picture of your capability than the verbal description you chose.
     
  3. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Not that that might not be helpful to the OP, but I just remembered as I was reading quote that you (Sethoflagos) posted from broazny and it reminded me of when I was in junior high school and was having the same lack of results as the OP while, yet, putting in a fair amount and consistent practicing. One day, I was so frustrated, I came out of my room, started talking with my parents, and then started crying, I was so frustrated. That prompted my parents to suggest (and ask me) that maybe I should see another teacher. I did, and in no time I was playing better. The difference between teachers was noticeable.
     
  4. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    Just sit down, relax, and play. Most of all enjoy making music. I've never put to much thought into it just played and practiced what needed to be practiced. Trumpet playing as with anything important to us can be hindered by a small lack of confidence. Not that anything is wrong with the OP but I try to always remember to check my head before anything else
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Until you can play them 8va! :lol:
     
  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    You mean the last verse 'descant' part for leads who can't improvise?
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Usually. But there can be other fun spots. When I joined the community band, I started on 3rd. You have to pay your dues to move up. I regularly took sections up 8va. Director was fine with it as long as I didn't lay an egg. On the 2nd part, many sections mimic the 1st, just 8vb, so I played those up. When playing 1st, there aren't too many spots that you can play 8va, although I would find them now and then. ;-)
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I did make a player mad one time in church. He was of the higher, louder, faster mindset. We had special offertory songs on occasion. We had been working on one were I was playing the 1st part in unison with him. He decides during the performance, that he wants me to play the divisi!!! He was quite rude about it! In truth, he didn't want me playing higher than him since he was the senior player and I was the newb! I dutifully played the 2nd divisi 8va!!! He turned red, but hey, I was playing the 2nd and we regularly played written parts 8va! Next thing I know, he's playing the 2nd part 8va in unison with me! Not a problem, I shifted to the 3rd divisi, 8va!!! ROFL He didn't speak to me for weeks!!! ROFL
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I actually prefer the second chair in big bands... They get most of the solo's don't cha know.:-P
     
  10. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    The trumpet is a very harsh mistress. This may sound cruel, but if you don't enjoy it, quit.
    I've known folks who struggled with a particular instrument, switched to something they enjoyed and not only became proficient, they loved playing again.
    Regarding all the parts, remember Phil Smith went from 4th/Auxiliary trumpet in the Chicago Symphony to co-principal then principal in the New York Philharmonic.
    The great Tonight Show band had trumpeters who could have switched seats and no one would really have noticed. They were all superior players. Bud Herseth once said that about the entire CSO brass section as well.
    Many players enjoy the lower parts and do great jobs with them. Personally, I'd rather play a lower part in a fabulous group where other trumpeters are better qualified than I on the upper parts than be top dog in a band where the lesser players aren't very good at all and make it difficult to make good music.
    I've been in both situations, too. I suppose that is being a musical snob, but so be it.
    Rich T.
     

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