Playing low (pedal) F's

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by craigph, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. craigph

    craigph Piano User

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    I've been working on Suite 1 of the Bach suites for solo cello as transcribed by David Cooper. I am slowly making improvement (articulation, phrasing, breathing etc) but have one consistent problem. There are a bunch of low F's scattered throughout (pedal F? - the one below low C). In the notes Cooper suggests playing them 123 with both 1st and 3rd slides out. I do this (well I use the third slide - don't have a trumpet with a first slide), but can't make them sound as proper notes. For example in the Courante (3rd movement) there are low F's in the 3rd and 4th bars in the middle of phrases, that for me always sound like fart-y noises rather than notes somewhere in the vicinity of F. I can play pedals down from F# - none of them sound like 'real' notes, but I can at least play them. But within a phrase I don't seem to be able to even hit the F right on. Its somewhere between E and G. Is it really possible to play such low F's as proper notes? I know I am not good enough now, but am wondering if the low low F will ever sound like a real note?
     
  2. hahkeystah

    hahkeystah Piano User

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    I can hit the F easily enough on my yammie, but it sounds weak and shaky. Might it have something to do with the horn? What I mean by that is: larger bore horns make that a stronger note?
     
  3. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    I normally pull and leave the 3rd slide out an extra half step. This changes the fingering of all 3rd valve notes; Ab/Eb is 3, D/G is 2+3, C#/F# is 1+3, and low F is 1+2+3. You can "tune" this length by checking third space C - open, or (new) 3rd valve.

    It is my contention that this would be a better setup for all trumpets, but have not had the courage to market it yet!:dontknow:

    Certainly it is a better solution for a 3 valve piccolo which is hardly ever used except for Baroque. I really don't like the feel of a 4 valve cluster, and I have pretty big hands:evil:

    Good luck!
     
  4. craigph

    craigph Piano User

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    I'm not talking about 'hitting' a note. I am talking about playing a note. That is, playing a low F within a line of music rather than just a one-off. As I wrote I CAN play that F easily enough. The problem is playing it as a a real note within a piece.
     
  5. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    I've always had problems with those bridging pedal tones as well. I can play pedal C down to pedal F#...but I can't seem to hit the F, E, & D (right below low C) very well. I'm not sure why it is....???

    Kujo
     
  6. craigph

    craigph Piano User

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    But leaving the third slide out, that low F would still be in the same place and still fart-y I suspect. (I haven't tried this yet - too late to pick up the horn right now.)
     
  7. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    I believe the question is about lengthening the trumpet for it to resonate on a low F, not to "force sound" an approximate note such as is found in some great warm-up routines.
     
  8. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    You should be able to play it as a real note. Remember low notes need to be thought "up" and high notes "down". Don't play the low F "in the cellar".
     
  9. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Sheesh, I didn't even know they wrote pieces down there for trumpet. Shows what I know!
    I think Mr.Hunter provides the best solution (leaving third slide out and using alternate fingerings) if you're consistently playing in that register. Just my 2c
     
  10. EdMann

    EdMann Mezzo Forte User

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    Seems to me that the more I play them, the more I can play them. Listen to Sandoval's "Rhythm" solo on youtube where he plays them down to double pedal C or so. All the pedal tones/notes speak, and I can tell you first hand that he spends a ton of time making these notes sound like "notes." There are a set of Bach etudes transcribed for trpt by Ralph Sauer which dive into pedal F, and after some practice, they start to sound like notes. Just play 'em more. I couldn't play them for over 35 years, and now, after practicing them daily (Maggio, Stamp), there they are.

    ed
     

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