Playing Musically

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by anthony, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    Not exactly. Neanderthal DNA was recently discovered in a small proportion of existing humans; thus, debunking the myth that they became extinct.
    Music has always been considered the Universal language. Even animals produce music. As a matter of fact some of the greatest works of music were written imitating animal or bird sounds. So, for one, just in case I have some Neanderthal DNA, do not wish to look down upon them. They were probably more intelligent than you think.
    I possess some ancient flutes created by PreColumbian Native Americans that are downright amazing and priceless.
    I know your statement is well intended, but we should not take our predecessors lightly.
    Best regards
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I prefer Clarke over Neanderthal flute music.
     
  3. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    Actually the Flutes were Mayan. But I prefer Trumpet as well. HaHa! One amazing fact was that an early Bach Stradivarius cost the same as a T-Model Ford. So I don't think trumpets were Neaderthal; although, I bet they did blow animal horns,( i.e. Shofars)
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The Neander valley was in Germany, pre-trumpet. Pre-Columbian flutes are equally uninteresting.

    Back to Clarke....
     
  5. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    The Neanderthals all play trombone now!
    Slides are so stone age.... we have valves now!
    LOL!
     
  6. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    Isn't playing musically the whole point of playing exercises?
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    There is a school of thought that chases "higher, faster, louder" in a way that doesn't have anything to do with making music. Neither moderators nor our Artists in Residence at TM can prevent that--we just try to subtly point it out when it happens--although rowuk tends to be less subtle than most of us. He has good reasons, though.
     
  8. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    I seem to be recovering from that school of thought. It takes a while. I have nothing to say about Rowuk for fear of being severely beaten with his words of encouragement. ;-)
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    He, he! Now truth is called "less subtle". I prefer to see it as the reader having received a steady diet of MUSH until that is all they want to eat. Then along comes somebody with a steak and they have to chew again. No one or two year old ever gave up on learning to walk because they fell down. They may have cried a bit to get noticed (that habit also sticks with many adults) but get right back up and do it again (that character trait often gets lost with age). No one should get discouraged because an angry, old fart like me challenged the MUSH in their life. Look in the mirror and be greatful that we can get down to business so quickly.

    In any case, I will say that musicality cannot be "taught" directly. That players need to learn pain, sorrow, exhiliaration, joy, love, ....... and then various ways to tie those experiences to notes.

    We cannot reduce a great performance to loud/soft, fast/slow, this technique/that technique. Great performances come from the soul and the best that a teacher can do is to couple lifes experiences with playing. I have a 13 year old student. She comes in and says "I HATE MY SISTER". I say then: you need to play the first scale like a flamethrower or lightening bolt. I want to HEAR HATE in your playing. What normally comes out is wimpy, because they really do NOT hate. Sometimes they even cry. The playing is musical though. Different, color, dynamics, even tempo.

    Yes, we need everything from clouds to lightening bolts, water to fire, yellow to blue, black to white, ying to yang. Even a single sixteenth note second line G does not need to be brainless.

    I agree with Vulgano Brothers "yup". I have challenged (and won) every decrescendo in that scale in the last movement of Cantata 51 however. We are in "Halleluja" mode, not in humble, sorrow, repent mode. Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen means Rejoice in the Lord all ye earth. That C is a mountaintop. There are enough soft low single 8th notes and midrange stuff for the rest of the world! Finale argument: Bach wrote necessary dynamics in the score. He was well acquainted with Gottfried Reiche his trumpeter. If an unnatural decrescendo was desired, he would have written it! The translation for alleluja is: (go look it up)
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011

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