Playing side lipped = higher range...?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Goku, May 20, 2010.

  1. mchs3d

    mchs3d Mezzo Forte User

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    Just another gimick that people think will make them "screamers." If you want to play high, learn to do it with your normal embouchure; your "best" embouchure.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    No No NO

    Moving the mouthpiece will wipe out what you have. Hopes of more range are fulfilled when the PLAYER gets more brains and just starts practicing more as well as more intelligently.

    There are pictures of renaissance cornett players playing from the corners. It does not increase range, it thins the tone out. I've been there and tried it.

    Basic physics tells us that we have the most endurance when we spread the work over the largest area. In the case of players chops, we spread the tension most evenly over the largest amount of muscle when the mouthpice is in the middle.
     
  3. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    I think I´ve heard that playing side lipped
    was standard for cornetto players in
    ancient days, this because it would make it
    easier for them to play softly.

    Someone else in here may know more about this . . .
     
  4. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    Jesus!

    You beat me by seconds this time, Robin!
    Your post wasn´t there when I started writing mine.:D
     
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Not a good idea. I occasionally play two trumpets at once which incorperates the corners. When I do this circus trick, range is NOT there. Every song is within the staff and (for me) its not feasible to scream using the corners.
    However, when I take the two trumpets off my face and go back to playing correctly, its like my lips had a rub down and they feel great.
     
  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Hi Goku,
    You can answer this question yourself. Think how many trumpet players use this technique to achieve range.
    Proof?
    Youtube any trumpet player you can think of and see if they do this.
     
  7. Goku

    Goku New Friend

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    Before marchingnetwork.tv was taken down, there was video proof of Shaw University's trumpet line using such a method. They even commented on the video themselves, citing, "that's where the screaming muscles are."
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Because you SCREAM with PAIN as that pert of the lip is not very tough.

    Just because stupidity is posted doesn't mean anyone has to believe it.
     
  9. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi Goku,
    Here's an idea:
    DCI is kicking up another season and you can email the best of the corps. Ask them the same question.
    I'm always open to new and fresh ideas. However, for me and from what I know, its not a very good idea to try and play in the upper register using the corners of the mouth.
     
  10. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Feb 27, 2008
    You aren't suggesting that the best place for everyone to play is in the center?

    I think it has more to do with where the orbicularis oris muscle is attached to the maxilla bone.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    There's a spot on the upper lip where the orbicularis oris muscle rejoins itself and attaches to the bone. It's usually relatively close to the center of the upper lip but varies slightly for everyone (and can be a ways away from the center). I think this, in addition to / combination with dental structure, is why the best spot to put the mouthpiece is different for everybody.
     

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