Playing Style

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by B15M, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    In a thread called "audition style", Manny talked about the style in the U.S. being similar from symphony to symphony.

    I was thinking that this is probably because of modern communication. We can all hear everybody's ideas and gradually they become our own and standard.

    My question for anybody is:
    With all of the economic globalization going on, will musical style become standard from country to country. I think so, but it will take some time.

    A question for Manny:
    A long time back we were talking about why we play C trumpet. It has been a long time since I read that thread but I think you advocated the use of B flat trumpet. There was a suggestion that you lead the way. Do you remember this and have you been playing more B flat trumpet?
     
  2. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    My answer is going to be I don't think that's ENTIRELY possible. Each of us has our own unique sound which is influenced by many factors: some physical, some environmental, some preferential, and some due to training. Each of us is also unique in our approach to any given marking. Example: "rit. poco a poco". Slow down little by little. That is pretty non-specific, and open to interpretation. Much of that interpretaion comes from the context of the piece, but some is open to the player/conductor based on what they feel sounds good. (This could go on for quite some time, but I think you can see my point of view).

    I think that we are definitely recording-driven. That is, I think many players (and quite a few conductors, I would guess) get locked into a specific recording, and hold that recording as a standrard in terms of sound, blend, tempi, style, etc. We get so fixed on that idea that anything else sounds wrong.

    One of my first experiences with taking notice of this came when I heard CSO's reorded Mahler 5 with Solti for London. I had been listening to the Bavarian Radio Symphony (on cassette tape; now lost, and I can't remember the conductor). There is a point in the 4th movement, I think it is, where the low brass sounds like Mahler is sobbing. I could even picture a man with his face in his hands, and the sobs wracking his body (with the Bavarian). Not so with Solti. It is faster. The first time I heard Solti's recording, I thought he was doing it all wrong. No disrespect to the great Maestro, but I was so used to the Bavarian recording, that his tempi just seemed wrong to me. The same thing happens with Beethoven 9. I am very used to the Berlin recording with Karajan that others just seem wrong. The legatos Karajan gets in the slow movement are simply amazing; the blend and timbral quality out of the orchestra under him is just magnificent. But other groups will produce things differently. I am sure MO plays Beethoven 9 in a different way, even more so under different conductors, yes Manny? As does NY or any other group. Again, due to personal factors of conductors and players and the marriage of those factors.

    I think the danger of recorded music is just that, and would sooner think that recordings are to blame (maybe why John Cage was quoted as never owning a stereo?) for more standardized interpretation than increased communication or more open global marketplace.

    Sorry for such a long-winded post; it's a question which demands long-winded answers. Very interesting topic!
     
  3. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

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    Well to be honest I think the availablity of records is a great thing. I can reach for my cd collection and have the NY Phil Brass section or the CSO with Herseth coming through my stereo - not the same as seeing a live concert, but since these orchestras don't tour very often it's the closest I can get.

    I think a lot of us UK types listen to the US orchestras, and some of my absolute favourite interpretations come from across the pond. That said, I'll be playing a Mahler symphony with an orchestra in the next few months, and I've been listening to an NYPO recording, a Weiner Phil one and have seen the LSO do it live - I'll try to draw something from everyone, but I'll still be using my Bb, and ultimately will still sound like me (unfortunately ;-) )

    I think it's good in that hearing new recordings you might realise something about the piece you never noticed before - perhaps some slightly different emphasis in a phrase, or a completely different approach. The "danger" I suppose comes from a so-called "definitive" recording, which might cause people to imitate it - perhaps at the expense of differing interpretations.
     
  4. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    Jack- Right you are. The definitive recording danger is exactly what I was addressing, even though I may come off as anti-recording. (I'm not; I do actually own a cd player! Alas, my record player is long deceased, though). My point is, again, in getting habituated to a certain recording or trying to achieve that "definitive" style. That may do more to minimialize the differences. Playing it "safe" in order to sell and make numbers.
     

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