Playing up an 8ve

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BrotherBACH, Dec 18, 2011.

  1. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    Manyard and others have said that one key to playing high is to take a tune and play it up an actave focusing on playing the piece musically. Well, I have discovered a website of some very simple "familiar" tunes that would allow me to do this and I thought others might like it as well. The simplicity allows me to focus on what I need to do physically and the tunes themselves allow me to hear the note in my head before I play which is also important. Hope this is useful.

    Up an octave would just be pusing my playable range which I think is a nice intermediate step.

    Free sheet music - Easy trumpet

    BrotherBACH
     
  2. Dupac

    Dupac Fortissimo User

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    Thanks for sharing, BB. :play:
     
  3. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    I have watched one video of Maynard where he talks about gradually taking a tune up maybe a third or fifth at a time. He stressed playing it until it was musical before taking it up the next little bit. I think a young/new player runs the risk of creating problems by trying to take things up an octave all at once. Range is developed slowly over the course of years. I have resigned myself to producing the best sound I can within my current range.
     
  4. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    Excellent thought. Even if it is only a fouth or a fifth. The range of most of these pieces and their simplicity would allow an intermediate to give try. A full octave was only mentioned because I can do that in my head as I play without too much difficulty (at least for these pieces), but a fourth or fifth will do.

    BrotherBACH
     
  5. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    Seems that fourth or a fifth would be a good mental exercise as well. Thanks for posting.
     
  6. treble_forte

    treble_forte Pianissimo User

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    Nice one thanks!

    The chords in the ones I have seen are concert pitch... Not transposed. Just a note for anyone improvising.

    Thanks!
    Mike
     
  7. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    Hey, if the composer didn't write them, I sure has hell ain't gonna try and play 'em. :lol:
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    it is a good transposition exercise also. I can't just "look at the music and take it up a third, or a fourth" -- such is life, however I can transpose it into a key that will do that --- so I cheat and write it down, but it works for me. I also take things up and octave, and transpose them down a third, or fourth -- so it is within my "somewhat musical" range, and I can play every note. Either way it does make things easier than just a regular 8Va (octave up).
     
  9. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Playing something up a minor third is an activity of more value than the next octave up. It stresses making something more musical first. Bringing all the conditions of the lower key into the register somewhat higher. Plus it teaches transposition. An invaluable tool for jazz soloing and other aspects of playing.

    Yet when we hear trumpet players take something 8va almost invariably they play it with a lot of stress, edge and clams. From this they learn to play with even more stress, edge and clams. "Rehearsing their mistakes" I like to call it. And the habit of lousy performance becomes ingrained and hard to get rid of.

    Which is the better teacher?
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    how did you ever manage to be a trumpet player with no imagination, or ever thinking outside of the the little black note thingies and how they are written??? ROFL ROFL ROFL
    oh, wait a minute -- you must be a "classical" trumpeter ----OK that explains it ROFL ROFL ROFL
     

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