Polishing Nickel Plate?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by LH123, May 18, 2011.

  1. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    True, but I didn't really see the need to get into that. I have a 19th century cornet that's made entirely of solid German silver, and it tarnishes badly in the spots I hold it after a few months of playing. It will polish to look like silver, though, and I've never known it to be slippery when polished.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Thanks Dale. Yours is an example which can clarify the confusion.

    Your Nickel Silver cornet is not slippery - but if it were Nickel Plated, i.e. covered with a coating of pure nickel, it would be slippery.
     
  3. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Turtle - here is a quote from Lenntech a water treatment company:

    "Health effects of nickel
    Nickel is a compound that occurs in the environment only at very low levels. Humans use nickel for many different applications. The most common application of nickel is the use as an ingredient of steal and other metal products. It can be found in common metal products such as jewellery.

    Foodstuffs naturally contain small amounts of nickel. Chocolate and fats are known to contain severely high quantities. Nickel uptake will boost when people eat large quantities of vegetables from polluted soils. Plants are known to accumulate nickel and as a result the nickel uptake from vegetables will be eminent. Smokers have a higher nickel uptake through their lungs. Finally, nickel can be found in detergents.

    Humans may be exposed to nickel by breathing air, drinking water, eating food or smoking cigarettes. Skin contact with nickel-contaminated soil or water may also result in nickel exposure. In small quantities nickel is essential, but when the uptake is too high it can be a danger to human health.

    An uptake of too large quantities of nickel has the following consequences:
    - Higher chances of development of lung cancer, nose cancer, larynx cancer and prostate cancer
    - Sickness and dizziness after exposure to nickel gas
    - Lung embolism
    - Respiratory failure
    - Birth defects
    - Asthma and chronic bronchitis
    - Allergic reactions such as skin rashes, mainly from jewellery
    - Heart disorders

    Nickel fumes are respiratory irritants and may cause pneumonitis. Exposure to nickel and its compounds may result in the development of a dermatitis known as “nickel itch” in sensitized individuals. The first symptom is usually itching, which occurs up to 7 days before skin eruption occurs. The primary skin eruption is erythematous, or follicular, which may be followed by skin ulceration. Nickel sensitivity, once acquired, appears to persist indefinitely.

    Carcinogenicity- Nickel and certain nickel compounds have been listed by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) as being reasonably anticipated to be carcinogens. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has listed nickel compounds within group 1 (there is sufficient evidence for carcinogenicity in humans) and nickel within group 2B (agents which are possibly carcinogenic to humans). OSHA does not regulate nickel as a carcinogen. Nickel is on the ACGIH Notice of Intended Changes as a Category A1, confirmed human carcinogen.



    Read more: Nickel (Ni) - Chemical properties, Health and Environmental effects


    so poisonous - yeah, probably in the right quantities and in vapourous forms like plating works.
     
  4. Myszolow

    Myszolow Pianissimo User

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    I must stop licking my trumpet then :-P:play:

    Many common coins have a lot of nickel in them, so it stands to reason that handling nickle is not harmful unless you do abnormal things with it.
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    No doubt that's why the Connstellation has an outer layer of lacquer ...... to protect the trumpet player from the nickel!!! Had no idea the slippery SOB was so toxic.:lol:

    And if you're gonna drop it, don't drop it on your foot. The Connstellation is a tank.

    Turtle
     
  6. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    .... maybe it could do you in, but so could too much water. :-( I was taught simply that ANYTHING that existed in a plating process or plating works was to be considered toxic - I watched some waste chemicals from a plating shop pumped into a waste fluid tanker - and it met something in there it didn't like ............ HAZMAT blokes came out of the woodwork so fast - and the truck got very warm.
     
  7. Myszolow

    Myszolow Pianissimo User

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    They use a lot of potassium cyanide (KCN) in the process, but there shouldn't be any left once the trumpet is washed. It would be very harmful if you drank it, but even spilling a bit of KCN solution on your skin is not too bad (once heard of a guy who fell in a large plating tank and the cyanide didn't kill him). It's cyanide gas (HCN) that's the real bad guy, but that shouldn't occur anywhere near a plating plant.

    They use KCN for silver plating as well and silver plated knives and forks are ok to use. (Not to mention silver plated mouthpieces ;-))
     
  8. LH123

    LH123 Piano User

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    So what's the advantage to silver-plated horns? It seems to be much more popular among pro instruments than nickel.
     
  9. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Answer: Nickel plating is slippery. Any cost difference in trumpet plating between nickel and silver is not very significant.

    An easy way to distinguish between nickel plating and silver plating on a highly polished surface is that the nickel plating has a darker look than silver. I'm not talking tarnish, but the actual look of the pure plating.

    Some very cheap imitation mouthpieces from the east were/are nickel plated - you can see this (color) difference when you compare one of these to a regular silver plated mouthpiece.
     
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Nickel plating is a lot darker than silver plating, you have to see them side by side to notice the big difference. Nickel is now a specialty plating that only some companies offer. It's basically off the map.:dontknow:

    Definitely more slippery, but has to be the most maintenance free finish. I've barely touched the Connstellation in months (with a cloth) and it still looks essentially perfect, like the day it arrived. The silver on the Severinsen needs a little attention every time I play it to look its best.

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2011

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