Polishing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by cobragamer, Aug 6, 2008.

  1. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Mar 21, 2006
    Toronto
    For normal upkeep polishing I use a cloth called Blitzcloth. One side of it has a bit of buffing compound on it and the other is there to wipe the compound off. I believe C.G Conn has a similar product.
    Of course I have access to buffing machines, so any real buffing for me would be done on those.
     
  2. Newguy

    Newguy Pianissimo User

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    Mar 30, 2008
    Pittsburgh Area
    Probably wouldn't do it any good. That's why I said just the hot water alone would not be good -- sort of implying that the salt and maybe the foil for all I know might also harm it!! Lacquer horn best left to WARM not HOT water and lots of TLC.
     
  3. bagmangood

    bagmangood Forte User

    any tips on a similarly spiffy way to do it for lacquer horns,
    or is there no way as cool and the aluminum and salt? :D
     
  4. Trumpet guy

    Trumpet guy Forte User

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    Boiling, huh? How do you get the horn in without burning your hands or dropping the horn?
     
  5. Newguy

    Newguy Pianissimo User

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    Pittsburgh Area
    Sliver horns seem to be real close to using a Staples "That was Easy" button, although, I have never done it. :dontknow: I don't think they have invented a "That was Easy" button for lacquer horns yet, just as I said, warm water and TLC. I guess it gives us a chance to "bond" with our horn!! :play::play:
     
  6. Newguy

    Newguy Pianissimo User

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    Mar 30, 2008
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    Horn in first, then add water.
     
  7. trumpflugel

    trumpflugel New Friend

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    I go to a local Snap-on Tool dealer and get a product called Metal Polish. It is made by Anthems. I know it sounds crazy, but I use it on a silver Bach Strad and a silver Yamaha Flugel, and they both come out brand new. Just tear off real small piece, and applied it to the horn. If the pad turns black, that means the chemical is deep cleaning the horn.:play:
     
  8. Trumpet guy

    Trumpet guy Forte User

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    Must take a while to heat up that much water.
     
  9. Trumpet Dad

    Trumpet Dad Pianissimo User

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    Jun 20, 2008
    New Jersey, USA
    From the Kanstul website...
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Q. What should I use to clean my horn?[/FONT]​
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] A. For lacquer horns, wipe clean with a soft cloth, such as flannel or an old t-shirt. We use Tarni-Shield on silver horns. We mix the product half and half with water. It goes on evenly, dries quickly and polishes off easily.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]You can get Tarni-Shield at most ACE hardware stores. I recently tried the hot water, baking soda and aluminum foil trick and it does a very good job removing tarnish from all the hard to reach spots. If you like a mirror finish, Tarni-Shield does a great job.
    [/FONT]​
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2008
  10. Trumpet guy

    Trumpet guy Forte User

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    Feb 9, 2008
    California
    Interesting, sounds a lot easier than the hot water and foil thing.
    So, how much does it cost, how much do you use each time for a full polishing, do you rub it on the horn or put the horn in it, and is it a universal precious metal polish or do you need a separate product for silver, copper, gold, etc. ...?

    :D sorry, lots of questions.
     

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