Polishing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by cobragamer, Aug 6, 2008.

  1. MFfan

    MFfan Fortissimo User

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    Sep 13, 2006
    Kalamazoo, Michigan
    As an update, how about Borax? Would that work like the Arm and Hammer Super Wash? Has sodium ...........something else.
     
  2. Rushtucky

    Rushtucky Pianissimo User

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    Sep 15, 2008
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    I have a silver Bach and I have found that Hagerty's Silversmiths Polish with R-22 Tarnish Preventative works wonders.

    Get a "mitten" for polishing silver instruments at your music store for finishing touches. Also while you are there, get a pair of cheap cotton gloves to wear while you are working on your trumpet.

    Your trumpet will look like new unless it is in real bad condition.
     
  3. Toot4fun

    Toot4fun New Friend

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    Dec 23, 2008
    I have read on some other sites that the hot water/salt method actually removes the silver from the item that is submerged. rowuk seems to say otherwise, but I just want to be sure before I try this. I have a Benge that is tarnished in some tough-to-reach places that I'd love to get shiny again.

    Are the salt and baking soda interchangeable (both do the same job)?

    Thanks!!
     
  4. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Ithaca NY
    The water/baking soda/salt/aluminum foil process works by setting up an ion carrying solution which transports the sulfur, which reacts with silver forming the black tarnish, from the silver to the aluminum. The baking soda/salt create a basic solution which enables the silver object to make good contact with the aluminum in the foil which has a naturally occuring coating of aluminum oxide (because aluminum, being very reactive, wants to combine whenever it can with another element - oxygen in this case), and the basic solution softens the oxide coating to let the silver get in touch with the aluminum. The whole reaction would work w/o the baking soda or salt, but works faster and better with them.

    This process leaves all the silver where it belongs.
    veery
     
  5. Toot4fun

    Toot4fun New Friend

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    Dec 23, 2008
    Thank you for that explanation - that makes a lot of sense.

    So does the aluminum foil need to be in direct contact with the trumpet for this to work? Or is it enough that it's in the solution? One of the previous posters asked a question similar to "should I wrap the trumpet in foil like I would a baked potato?" that I don't think was ever really answered.

    Also, what happens to the sulfur? Is it suspended in the solution and should be rinsed off or does it "stick" to the foil?
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    One other thing:

    cleanliness is next to godliness. If you clean your horn often, the crud comes out much easier.

    Laquered horns just get hot soapy water and the snake. Silver horns get the hot soapy water first and then the hot salted water with aluminum foil. Gold horns get the hot soapy water, snake and then window cleaner with the soft cloth. Unfinished horns get the soapy water and snake, and depending on the degree of tarnish: Brasso, gun wadding or my buffing wheel.
     
  7. Toot4fun

    Toot4fun New Friend

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    Dec 23, 2008
    I picked up my trumpet a few weeks ago for the first time in years. Needless to say, it doesn't have the same shine and sparkle that it did, but it's nothing that a little TLC won't fix.

    Back to my one of my previous questions - do you wrap the trumpet in the foil or is it enough that it's in the solution with the instrument?
     
  8. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Put the foil on the bottom of the container and the horn on top of it. Or wrap it up if you like, it won't hurt. It is harder to monitor the progress that way.

    The sulfur combines with the aluminum. Just toss or recycle the foil.
    veery
     
  9. Toot4fun

    Toot4fun New Friend

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    Dec 23, 2008
    Thank you for clearing up those two points. Now one last thing as I search for something large enough to handle this. Some of the previous posts said that 1 cup of baking soda was good for about 5.5 gallons of hot water. Does this sound accurate? In this scenario, is there such a thing as "too much" baking soda?

    Thank you!!!
     
  10. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Ithaca NY
    Two table spoons per quart of water. 1/2 cup per gallon. You can't use too much but it is a waste. Add a teaspoon salt for each tbsp of soda.
    Containers? A plastic tub like the ones used for busing tables in a restaurant. Or a large cooler. A kitchen/restaurant supply store will have something. Or the plastic bins for storing things. You only need to fill it enough to cover the trumpet. Put in the horn and measure as you pour until it is covered. Pull the horn out, add salt and soda to match the amount of water you put in. Give it a thorough stir. Put in the foil and the trumpet on top to hold the foil down. An hour should be enough. Tarnish goes away.
    veery
     

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