Poor Endurance. help!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RyanM11, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    There is no quick fix. Endurance issues are virtually always from poor air flow. I recommend the Chicowicz Lone Tone Studies available at Balquhidder Music and Clarke Technical Studies. Like VB recommends, these are low impact studies and when done properly, are truly of great benefit.
    Many experts say you must rest as much as you play. Do not force anything. When you feel fatigue, stop playing. I do lip flaps, but be very careful how emphatic you are when doing them. Just a few seconds and not so hard you bruise your lips. Yes, that can happen if you are too forceful. Gentle massage also works well.
    No matter what you may read here, EVERYBODY gets tired at some point. Great orchestral players, soloists, jazz pros, brass band players, etc. eventually get tired, but they have trained themselves to the point it takes a while before they reach that point.
    Proper hard work will bring the results you want, but it isn't going to happen overnight and a good teacher is also needed.
    Rich T.
     
  2. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    I usually get the "loose lip flapping" when I stick my head out the window while I am driving. But seriously, you haven't written as to what and how long your practice sessions are. When you mention rehearsal, I am ass/u/ming that you are playing in a band or group? Type of music? Is it loud? Are you using too much lip pressure? All these things play a factor in your endurance.

    If there is one thing I have learned from the forums, it is to rest as much as you play. Long tones, breath control, proper warm ups/ warm downs, etc. all contribute immensely to endurance.
     
  3. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    Good advice from all above, but the problem could be the mouthpiece you're using. I tried a Monette B2 mouthpiece and my endurance went out the window.:oops:
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Swelling is normal for many. It should be no big problem if you practice at home until the swelling starts - and then keep going. I recommend inhaling more slowly and much more deeply before playing as well as lots of lipslurs. They help our chops gravitate to their most efficient natural state.

    I think that you are probably used to quitting when the going gets tough. Thick lips are no hindrance. Just keep going!
     
  5. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    How long have you been playing the trumpet?
     
  6. RyanM11

    RyanM11 New Friend

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    Sorry for not replying to the questions I've been asked and all of the much appreciated tips. (School work, marching band rehearsals, etc..) I have been playing for 7-8 years, my practice sessions, typically, last about 30-45 minutes before the swelling begins, then I push through until I've played about an hour to an hour fifteen minutes. (This is all after playing in the ballpark of 4 hours in school with an hour rest between.) Pressure isn't a problem for me (I like my teeth how they are. :-)) But since I posted this my endurance has gotten a lot better from pushing through the swelling, however, I would still like to be able to practice (after school rehearsals and such) for more than 2 hours. I'll definitely be looking into everything that's been suggested.

    Thanks a million!
     
  7. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Do you have a sensible warm up? It sounds like you are just picking the horn up and just playing what ever.
     
  8. RyanM11

    RyanM11 New Friend

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    Mar 31, 2011
    Houston, Texas
    I do about a 10-15 minute 'warm up' that consists of long tones, slurring, pedals, low notes, and some articulation exercises. According to my director (a very good trumpet player) I have a good warm up routine. One of the first things I tried to look at when I noticed that I couldn't play as long as my stand partners was if my warm up worked.
     

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