Potential market turnaround

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ConnDirectorFan, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    The article states that the Chinese market for the best in pianos, Steinway, could boost declining sales...with that being said, I read a post from someone in China, stating that the Chinese import trumpets [that are either sworn at or sworn by] are not sold much in China itself! Rather, American and Japanese horns are seen in music stores...with that being said, does anyone else find it kind of funny how Steinway could be exporting to China when Bach and other large brands import a Chinese student horn [Bach was even mentioned in the article for the Strad] - along with a lot of other things imported from China...? And the Essex and Boston brands owned by Steinway are made in China, something that the Steinway co. finds annoying when people ask "Are Steinways made in China?" - answer is No, but the budget brands are...etc.
    Yes, it's just market economy at work, but I still find it funny and ironic...
     
  2. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Not surprising to see Pianos made in china getting better...but a little surprised to see Steinlays are made there.

    I never saw a Bach Strad sold in China. Even if I saw one in the shop, it would surely be a copy - could never trust it to be made in USA.

    China will be a good supplier of quality instruments in the near future - student horns are the mass produced items.

    I had a Conservatorium student teaching me Sax while I was in Shanghai (2002-08), he happily travelled to Japan to buy his Mk VI selmer, and he had a Hummingbird model - all legit. I took him to my shop in Shanghai to help me select my tenor Sax, an eye opener for him. He never trusted Chinese made, but after 2 hours he walked away convinced there was good quality available in China.

    Agree with you, it is ironic.
     
  3. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    In every industry, Chinese manufacturing starts poor. They start by knowing how to copy but not knowing the how's and whys of what makes good vs. bad. And then, naturally, they learn, and learn fast. 20-30 years from now they will have cost and quality beat, just like Japan did. Just like Korea and Taiwan. And so on.

    Remember electronics?
    Audio/video?
    TVs?
    Cars?
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    A pilot told me a story that the Chinese copied a Boeing 747 "perfectly", but it wouldn't fly.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2013
  5. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    I'm in the food and beverage industry, and the big OEMs are in Europe. And they still manufacture there. They have been trying for years to get the quality right in China and can't. They can't even get proper raw materials. 316 stainless steel in china isn't. It's crap that will rust in a heartbeat. But the OEMs tell me change is coming. Some Chinese manufacturers are copying their equipment and food manufacturers are getting in trouble, but some are starting to get their copies right. Same for drinking water treatment systems. We put an engineer in china for a year to work with a local manufacturer to teach them WHY things worked. They got it, and so will these guys.
     
  6. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Yep!
     
  7. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    Oops, I "mis-explained" that - American Steinways are being sold in China in greater numbers, apparently. Steinway has two sub-brands, Boston and Essex, and these are Chinese-made...

    But at the same time, while Chinese horns are often mass-produced student horns, the mass-produced Hoxon Taiwanese student horns are quite good, and they have been for the past decade...but then you see Delick products, basically looking like a Chinese-made $50 shell assembled and finished in Taiwan...
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2013
  8. grantyg

    grantyg New Friend

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    I hope they do decline because my students who have bought the cheap stuff - usually one instrument with different name stamp on! have all suffered allergies from the high nikel content - I even sent 10 away to be tested and the high nickel was common as was cadmium from the epoxy - the tests basically said if they were toys they would be banned!
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Nickel Silver is often called German Silver, but I don't know why. However, I do know it has the most stable coefficient of expansion vis a meter bar is made from it as I once used myself in cartography and subsequently sold a few. Too, I've used many cadmium based oil colors (colours), yellows and reds. It is not so much the product, but the failure of instruction in handling many products. Too, I've worked with a chemical compound that one drop on one's skin will kill in the next minute, but you should have seen the hazmat suit I wore when handling it. Yeah, and I've still a gripe about how many still live in homes that contain asbestos (resin tiles, floor coverings, and exterior shingles and roofing, and too lead based oil paint. Isolating a child's allergy is a tedious undertaking for the competent medical specialist, not an instrumental music instructor who isn't thus qualified ... nor is the school administration that supplied such instruments (and do they show the slightest concern???). I could rant more about this ... but no one really cares to read or listen. I know no resource for nitrite gloves in children's sizes.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Not to worry about this too much ... Steinway and their other companies such as Conn-Selmer may soon become history as Steinway is sold to Kohlberg & Co.
     

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