Poulenc Trio?

Discussion in 'EC Downloading' started by JackD, Nov 7, 2005.

  1. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

    736
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    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    Hi Ed,

    I'm currently playing the Poulenc Trio with a few friends from college, and while it's a great piece, I'm struggling a little with some of the delicate high passages. The pp slower melody in the first movement in particular I find pretty tricky after what comes before it, and the second movement is similar (having to return to the melody after the accompaniment figures I find tricky).

    Any tips?

    Oh, and I'm doing it on Bb since I don't own a C (damn it!)

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  2. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

    2,212
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    Jul 13, 2005
    NY/CA
    Jack,

    Yes. Do it on a C.

    Oops.........since that option is lost; consider that many players play this very difficult piece too short. Poulenc is writing very lightly and tongue-in-cheek, but lightly shouldn't be interpreted as Stravinskyesque short/sec. Maybe your balance is deteriorating because of this? (or maybe you have your tongue in your cheek. If that's the case, put it back where it belongs)

    Listen to the noodling horn line and play beautifully with that, reserving your driest sec for the 4 notes when everyone plays that way. Also, keep your bell up in the soft, high bits.

    Hard to say from 8 time zones away, amigo, but that's my best shot.

    Cheers,
    EC
     
  3. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

    736
    1
    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    Thanks Ed! Yes I think I might be taking the "sec" thing a bit too far. Thanks for the tips.

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  4. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

    3,418
    374
    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    Make sure the soft attacks are on time. Don't hold back on the attacks.
    Some players seem to hesitate before those quiet entrances......DON'T!
    Wilmer
     
  5. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

    736
    1
    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    Thanks Wilmer. That's something I've been working on eliminating from my playing in general, and I think some of those entrances have highlighted for me the benefits of not hesitating.

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  6. stephenwright

    stephenwright New Friend

    32
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    Dec 28, 2005
    England, UK
    I'm an absolute trumpeting peasant and I've not played the Poulenc but I'm studying in school at A level. Sometimes I find I hesitate before entries in other pieces and the way I've found of getting round this is by not breathing up til the last second. That way as soon as the air's gone in it's making it's way out again and that way there's no time for hesitation/over-complicating. Dunno if that's quite what you meant but it's my best.

    Stephen
     
  7. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

    736
    1
    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    Hi Stephen, my teacher John Miller has pretty much eliminated this from my playing now! He got me to count myself in every time I play, and also used the "circle" analogy HÃ¥kan Hardenberger also uses - allowing no hesistation, a very simple yet eerily effective method it seems!
     
  8. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

    2,212
    8
    Jul 13, 2005
    NY/CA
    Stephen,

    Welcome to the forum. We're all peasants (but pleasant) here :-)

    To quote Arnold Jacobs, the late and great American tubist and pedagogue "the air MUST remain in motion".

    Breathe in rhythm and don't stop inhaling until it's time to attack/exhale. You can turn it around in a millisecond.

    Cheers, mate
    EC
     
  9. Philippe

    Philippe New Friend

    15
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    Oct 17, 2005
    breathe in time, play in time
    Philippe
     
  10. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

    2,212
    8
    Jul 13, 2005
    NY/CA
    Philippe,

    Assuming that you don't have a cold, yes (take 2 Xeno Xtra Strengths and see me in the morning)

    Happy new year, amigo,
    EC
     

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