pp Attacks in the morning

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by commakozzi, Feb 7, 2008.

  1. commakozzi

    commakozzi Pianissimo User

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    Oct 30, 2007
    Georgia, USA
    My warm-up in the morning consists of about 6 mins of breathing, 2 mins of buzzing w/o mouthpiece, 5 mins of buzzing on the mouthpiece, then I do the suggested warm-up out of the Vizutti books. The Vizutti warm-up includes long tones starting on either C7, C-7, or Cdim7(b5), and then it goes on to some scale studies. I start the long tones at pp, and on some mornings I have a hard time with that attack. In fact, each time I come back to the horn during the day my response is lacking. I think that it's part physical and most mental. Anyone had any problems with this during your day, and have you come across any advice on how to approach this?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I always start without the tongue. Inhale-exhale without any break or tension in between and then inhale-play. Once that works, I add the tongue.
    Generally the attacks get messed up when your breathing is not synchronized.
     
  3. Patric_Bernard

    Patric_Bernard Forte User

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    You can always attack loud first. Theres no need to start out playing soft if you have no idea what pitch your gonna be on... Just start out with a nice mf attack and then back off. This is to not only get whatever pitch your gonna start on going, but also help sync up your attacks and your breathing first thing......

    Unless your practicing for a "Oh shit i dont have time to warm up and I have a gig in the morning playing 'Carnival of Venice'."
     
  4. commakozzi

    commakozzi Pianissimo User

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    Yeah, I believe that's most of the problem. However, it's not as easy to fix as just knowing that it's the problem... I have a huge mental hang up on attacks for some reason.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Comma,
    start by thinking of breathing as a circle. The left side is inhaling, the right exhaling. Note at the top and bottom of the circle that there are no bumps, gaps or sharp angles - inhale and exhale that way. Do it a couple of times until it is S M O O T H. The top point of a circle is infinitely small, your transition from in- to exhale should also be: relaxed and not of great length! Then replace exhale with play (on the mouthpiece to keep your routine). PAY ATTENTION to the top and bottom of that circle of breath! Once it works with the mouthpiece, try it with the horn. Practice slowly, without the tongue until it is perfect for long tones, then try and add the tongue at the TOP of the circle. This takes a while to synchronize, but if you go slowly, the rewards pay off VERY quickly!
    The end result on a gig is that you inhale on even multiples of the beat to create that circle of breath. Concentrate on the bump free transition from in- to exhale and vice versa!!
    The answer lies in the slow motion approach to dissecting problems!
     
  6. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    As you get older, pp attacks in the morning (early AM hours) become too easy, even common......:lol:
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Spending some time with "Pooh" attacks can be a big help--inhale to the top of the circle, then release the note with a gentle "pooh." Take the horn off the face and do it again. If it doesn't happen the first try, make note of it, yes, but don't stress and do it again. At some point in time it will work. Once again, make note of it, and try to repeat the success. With practice, over time, it will become easier.

    For the "Pooh" attack to function, lips and air must be coordinated, a real tough thing to do cognitively. Your body becomes the teacher. When we can do this on a fairly consistent basis our tongue no longer attacks the note--it releases it, and by doing so we can shape articulation to our will.

    Be patient, and have fun!
     
  8. RG111

    RG111 Piano User

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    I have a tape of a PBS show that has Hardenberger warming up exactly as VB describes. He apparently does that followed by Stamp.
    Roy
     
  9. et_mike

    et_mike Mezzo Forte User

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    Try less water before bed!! Then the pp attacks should be cured!...

    Seriously though.... along with the breathing advice from Rowuk.... my teacher has me doing quarter notes at pppppppppppp (as soft as possible but still sound like a note) for a minimum of 2 min straight.... quarter note, quarter rest, quarter note, quarter rest, etc. Trust me, once you done it for a while... you won't even think about the attack... you just do it.
     
  10. trumPF

    trumPF New Friend

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    Aug 14, 2007
    Miami, FL
    Mike, just curious, which notes do you use for the 2 minute quarter notes? Just one, or up and down a scale, etc.
     

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