Practical Grades 4, 5, 6, 7 & 8 for Trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetfart123, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    May 9, 2010
    Ireland
    Hi,

    I was wondering, how long it takes to complete each of the above grades. I try practice every day or second day for at least half an hour. I have my Grade 3 Practical Exam at the end of March, but am curious to find out, how long you have to spend working on each grade.

    Many thanks
    TrumpetFart123 :cool:
     
  2. Conn-solation

    Conn-solation Pianissimo User

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    On my way to Bearberry Ab
    A hundred hours of practicing the material for each grade would likely get you close to passing.....:play: Well - I'd be close to passing anyway......:D
     
  3. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    May 9, 2010
    Ireland
    nice one thanks for the info
     
  4. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    Mar 25, 2005
    Indianapolis, In
    I am sorry to disagree with the 100 hours of practice, but it depends on how one practices. The way you practice can help to make things happen for you. I woud seriously doubt that 30 minutes a day is going to get you there very quickly.
     
  5. Conn-solation

    Conn-solation Pianissimo User

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    On my way to Bearberry Ab
    Ok.... 30 minutes a day = 200 days to a hundred hours..... 1 hour/day = 100 days/(a little over 3 months) to a hundred hours..... Will it take more or less than the hundred hours.... yes it does depend your current abilities on how you practice and how much tutoring you are getting....

    If a person sets a goal of doing a hundred hours of practice over 100 days of time, and focuses their practice on the syllabus requirements, You may well do one practical grade in that time...... Just don't beat yourself up if it happens to take a little longer. after the 100 hours/100days of work you definitely will be better than when you started and a lot closer to your goal.
     
  6. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Nov 16, 2009
    Near Portland, OR.
    This kind of apothecary accounting of practice time in terms of hours is profoundly misguided. Sounds like you are trying to buy a token of achievement by exchanging time for it. I understand the need to standardize things and set clear goals that can be somewhat objectively measured, especially for kids learning in the frame of a larger educational system. However, these are tools for learning music, not an end in themselves. What matters more than how much time is what that time is spent doing. What matters is sound, intonation, articulation, timing, musicality. These are the only criteria by which practice should be measured. Teachers are here to guide you by using the tools mentioned above and by also pointing to you areas of playing that need practice. I doubt you'll be told exactly how much time to spend on them but you certainly will be told if practice has been fruitful or not.
     
  7. Conn-solation

    Conn-solation Pianissimo User

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    On my way to Bearberry Ab
    I agree with you totally. The OP asked for a type of accounting for time..... I expanded from there and you and s.coomer brought up some of the important practical aspects of the process. If 'trumpetfart' reads and understands the total interaction of all the factors he/she can arrive at a realistic conclusion about the original question.

    .... How long is a string.......? The answer to that question will give you a good idea about the answer to the OP question.......
     
  8. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    May 9, 2010
    Ireland

    Hi guys, many thanks for all your info, I am just looking for a general rule of thumb, not in a mad rush to plough through these grades.

    Thanks again:cool:
     
  9. mctrumpet98

    mctrumpet98 Pianissimo User

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    Sep 29, 2011
    Down Under
    30 minutes of diligent practice every day is better than the four hours a day some people spend screwing around.
     

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