Practice at Work

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark B, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I play on my mouth piece while driving into work, but the key is to play the mouth piece into a towel. This gives a comfortable resistance (you control the resistance level by how hard the towel is held). What I have found by doing this is my stamina and control has increased tremendously. I got the idea by reading a piece on Coltrane that he would practice for hours with a towel stuck into his bell. Playing against such resistance made his playing with the towel removed relaxed and fluid. So now I take my mouth piece ONLY with me on business trips and use towels per courtesy of Hyatt, Marriot, Wyndham, Rock Resorts, etc. to keep my chops in prime condition when on the road. Give it a try and let me know if it works for you as well after a week or so of practice.
     
  2. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    What posture problem? I'm in a sitting position in my mini-van and I use a pocket trumpet.

    As for a music stand, I typically do long tones, scales, and Clarke exercises so I don't need music.

    When the option is practice in your car for 30 - 60 minutes or don't play at all during that time I think the choice is clear.
     
  3. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Absolutely.
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    What a great idea!

    I didn't know that about Coltrane, that is interesting. I've found that, since I bought a smaller bore trumpet (first a Conn 8B, then a 38b), it's easier for me to play lightly with less pressure. You HAVE to lighten your approach with a smaller bore. Then, going back to my Severinsen, I've noted that it plays so much more easily for me. Kind of the same idea, I think.

    Turtle
     
  5. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    If you're used to a smaller bore, couldn't switching to a larger bore tire you out sooner?

    (I realize there are other factors between trumpets than just bore size. So please interpret my question with the assumption that all other factors are equal.)
     
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    My personal experience is , YES! I was recently given a Blessing Super Artist w/a .468 bore. It's awesome but it does make me tired sooner.
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Yes. That's part of the equation. BUT, if you are used to playing the smaller bore, with a lighter approach, and you can transfer that lighter approach to the medium bore, it will take LESS air .... Than if you play it normally, muscle it around, overblow, etc.

    Turtle
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I also believe there is muscle physiology as well as bore effects at play with the techniques quoted above. As a physician, I educate my patients if they want to develop muscle (skeletal muscle for building strength, smooth muscle for relaxing artery tone that reduces stress effects influencing blood pressure response) that you have to exercise these muscles AT LEAST every 2 days to maintain maximal muscle tone. The toned muscle has just as much effect on maintaining strength, endurance (stamina) as the Trumpet physics of air flow. Therefore, toned muscle will overcome the demands placed on blowing through a larger bore. You know you are there when just like the writers of the last quote noted, you feel that you can now play with lightening the pressure used to blow through the lead pipe.

    To those who haven't tried it, for at least two weeks, blow COMFORTABLY WITHOUT STRAINING into a towel through your mouthpiece for about 20-40 minutes (a drive to work on my time scale) at least every other day and let me know in a couple weeks if you think it takes less effort to get the same sound out of your horn. If this works, don't thank me, thank Coltrane. I'm just a physician that tries to bring music and medicine together in my practice and teaching.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2011

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