Practice Heaven.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Drums too. With a shed I can get an acoustic kit, rather than another Roland electronic kit.

    T
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Yep, with electrical permit and inspection about any size shed can be put on most properties replete with electrical light, heat and AC in addition to electronics, unless homeowners' association or condo owners association by-laws prohibit such. Too, such will often mandate zoning variances in established historical parts of city / town. Still, and especially at my age, lengthy sessions will bring about the urgency to utilize the facilities of a rest room aka bathroom and that can be a conundrum. Sure I know all about potty jars my ancestors have used, and on occasion when visiting with them I've used myself, but I sure didn't like them then nor would I want to use them now, even if they were a so called chemi-john as some wilderness campers utilize.
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Local ordinances are shed friendly ..... IF said shed is for the sole purpose of trumpet practice, no stinkin permits are required (just kidding). Actually, if it's less than 200 sq. ft. and under 10 feet tall and has no electric or plumbing, no building permit is necessary. Normal setbacks need to be observed, 6' from side prop line and 10' from back.

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2011
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    In general, I agree that local governments are friendly toward sheds, but set backs and other required specifications may vary from one local government to another. Here, other than those as are grandfathered in respect to such ordnances, the side setback is 25 feet and the rear only 15 feet, if not abetting another residential property upon which there is a home already constructed which then would also be 25 feet. Even to bring a prebuilt onto the property requires a site permit as costs just $10.00, the jiss of this is that forever after you'll have an appropriate property tax increase. Also here they do allow electricity and plumbing but such requires two more permits and each of these are $25.00 as includes code compliance inspection fee the crux is that such utilities must be installed by respectively a licensed electrician and a licensed plumber and their fees are not cheap. Too, where I want my new shed is 100 feet back from our house and I will be running the electricity undergound inside a conduit and my plumbing all has to be buried four feet (below the frost line) and the sanitary sewer hook-up will merge with the house line not closer than 10 feet nor greater than 25 feet, still the total run of the new sewer line is 235 feet. I hope to have in floor heating throughout under a tiled floor as laid over a concrete slab. My AC will be from 2 Mitsubishi wall installed units. The framing will provide a main area 16'x24' floor space with a vaulted ceiling, the bath just 8'x12'. abutting another 8'x12' space for closet/storage.

    At present my CAD design is now with the architect. All this is not expected to become reality in 2011 and is contingent upon my improving health thereafter. My wife says I could live there and indeed I could with little modification (the addition of a kitchenette).
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Something worth sharing here, even before building begins ....

    I have a copy of the Sweetwater Pro Gear catalog and there are several pages devoted to "Acoustic Treatment". This is dense material that is intended to be glued up onto existing walls and ceilings to shape the sound, capture low frequencies and control the unwanted bouncing around of sound in smaller spaces. The kits come in small shaped chunks that you place around the room, on the walls, ceiling, and in the corners (bass traps).

    These kits are worth considering for the acoustical treatment of any practice or recording space. They look like they're really easy to install (glue guns). You just figure out the pattern (usually you're NOT covering all the surfaces, not even half ...), and glue it all into place. They look a little odd, so check with the wife first.:lol:

    The brand here is Cauralex Acoustics and these kits are called "Roomintators". There are kits for 250-400 sq ft rooms ($1199 2009 prices), 100-250 sq ft ($849), and on down in size ...... $599, $399, and $139.

    Essentially these kits can take a normal room (with regular paneling, sheet rock, etc.) and make them excellent studio recording environments. They also have a lot of sound proofing quality as well, isolating these rooms.

    Apparently you get better sound and cleaner recordings when you tame the sort of unwanted bouncing around of sound waves in a small room. No doubt practicing in one of these acoustically treated rooms is going to be more pleasant on your ears as well.:thumbsup:

    Turtle
     
  6. jdostie

    jdostie Piano User

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    Rowuk pointed me to some sites that then got me looking at still other Sites until I found dawbox.com. These are not the large practice havens being talked about here, but look like just the ticket for me... Now it still have to scare up the money to build one, but . . . It's a keck of a lot cheaper, and at least nominally portable.

    http://www.dawbox.com/
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    jdostie,

    That is just a great site .... (thanks again, Rowuk!). It sounds like those contraptions are very portable (with some dismantling). Very interesting. Making me rethink.

    Turtle
     
  8. Melloman

    Melloman New Friend

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    If you can make it the two feet bigger, I would. Two feet of material isn't going to cost that much more and it will give your group some "comfort room."
     
  9. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    An update on the shed ....... I stopped considering it when the calculated cost went over $4K.

    I built a patio instead in that spot. There's another spot on the property here, with a "deck" that's just a foot off the ground, that never gets used. Now, I'm considering hiring somebody to throw up a quick shed on that spot, using the deck as the floor of the shed. New size will be 9 foot by 9 foot. My intended musical groups keep getting smaller ...... but overall, the cost will be considerably less. I'm going to try to get an estimate this weekend. New potential cost .... $1K - $2K. That's for the shed, with floor, trick ventilation system I intend to build, electricity, sheetrock and acoustical treatment that should render it mostly soundproof. We'll see ......

    Turtle
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Sorry for such a delayed reply to this comment, but thanks Turtle for shedding legal light on this topic!
     

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