Practice Heaven.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Oh, oh. Sounds like someone will need to get a permit!
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think it would be impossible to get any kind of real balance between the instruments. Rehearsals train groove, balance and cooperative playing (who gets to chorus when and for how long.......). When one of those things is severely comprimised, is it any good? You'll find out on a real stage!

    I won't play unmuted in a room that small alone.
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Yes, of course, permits.

    I think this is going to help me a lot .... on many occasions, in lessons, my teacher would point out how QUIETLY I play. "Make some noise" he says. I spend too much time attempting to be considerate of my neighbors. I don't think that minding your volume all the time is good for your development. The acoustical treatment should make it nice on my ears and good for recording as well.

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2011
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    It's too small anymore for any sort of group playing ..... This is going to end up being a practice room and nothing more (an office too). It should be good for me psychologically, as I always seem to be thinking about my volume. The acoustical treatment should make it very nice on the ears. My teacher's office is about that size and where he does a lot of his practicing for the symphony (in between classes and students), at full volume. You can hear it throughout the building it's so loud ...... no acoustical treatment, just regular sheetrocked walls. What's the problem with unloading volume in a space that size???

    Turtle
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    TJ,
    what is wrong is how our ears/brain/sense of audio perception works.

    Our brain reacts differently to early reflections (<10ms) compared to late reflections. The early reflections are used to locate the sound source, late reflections (>30ms) are used to qualify the sound source - timbre, quality of attack, artistic considerations.

    When we shoehorn everything into the early reflection time, we actually hurt the ability to form the sound. Our brain is confronted with a way brighter sound than it prefers and tells the lips to darken the tone. What is left is a very dull tone when we are in a good room.

    Early reflections are actually part of the human defense system. Knowing where the enemy is as early as possible is a great advantage. Ever wonder why Moms see and hear so well?????????????????
     
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Yes, I understand what you're saying now. The soundproofing solves my volume anxieties .... but it's still just a tiny practice space and not the ideal because performing venues are always larger. So ...... practice help, but not practice heaven. There still needs to be practice in larger spaces to develop our sound.

    Right. When I go into a large space, like a huge classroom on campus, or on a rare occasion, an empty auditorium ..... my sound is small and, yeah, sort of dull. It takes an adjustment and a conscious effort to fill the space, which is not easy. Maybe a good balance effort would be to spend time on a hill top, trying to fill a valley with sound (like Rafael Mendez used to do when he was a kid). Not the most practical idea .... :lol:

    Turtle
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    There is a small 5 x 6 rehearsal cubical I sometimes play out of at the University. It is a modular sound proof unit, but has this mic system built into the room, that you can set a reverb function that makes it sound like a big room.

    Rowuk, I am sure you are aware of such modules. I would be interested if these rooms address the hearing-brain interface. If this is the case, would it be possible for TJ to add such a device to his shed (since he will have electric wiring in the unit)?
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think the issue is not the synthetic late reflections, I think that the entire content of your sound being reflected back by blowing into a close wall is the problem here. Remove those frequencies by heavy damping and it gets even worse. All of the really fine players that I work with, have a high proportion of big(ger) room play.

    Bottom line: nothing beats a large good sounding room. The more directional an instrument, the bigger the problem. On the other hand, undisturbed practice is a greater advantage than domestic challenges.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2011
  9. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Just a couple of cents worth from someone who often needs to practice into a cupboard full of clothes. (My version of your small cubicle room).

    I took the opportunity, when my Harrelson Bravura was delivered, to follow the climatization process as directed. I managed to "borrow" the local Scout Hall for an hour and a half each afternoon for a couple of weeks - a big open space, brick walls, unlined, no ceiling - you could see the lower side of the roofing and I thought that it would be awful. The outcome surprised me - a lot - I advanced much faster than I thought possible, I got to know my trumpet very quickly, and I had a real idea what it would sound like in a big empty space. Now I know we don't usually find ourselves in a big 'empty' space, but knowing what the instrument would do, and how hard I needed to focus to make it do those things was invaluable to me.

    I still practice in a small room, but every couple of weeks, I have to find a big room - sometimes even a large carpark, and have a blow.
     
  10. Bruce Molinari

    Bruce Molinari New Friend

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    Living in the North East, where it rains every other day, I fight a never ending battle with mold, mildew, termites & carpenter ants. I don't know the conditions of your property, but for only a few cents more on your building materials, I like the green board sheet rock. It is water and mildew resistant. Use as much pressure treated lumber as possible. Keep in mind that you are not going to use your shed as much as your house. Your house is climate controlled because you and your family are in it all of the time. That climate controled atmosphere helps fend off mold & mildew. Also there are additives that you can add to your paint that will help. One I have used for years is Di-All MC-2 Mildewcide. It works for all paints. Should always be used for wall paper paste. If you are going to keep instruments and music in the shed you should run a dehumidifier on damp days. They can be set to run automatically so it's no big deal. Also regardless to how small the shed is you should use a roof venting system the same as if you were building a house. Intake through the eve and exhaust out a ridge-vent. Best of luck
     

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