Practice routine

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by resonator, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. resonator

    resonator New Friend

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    Jan 7, 2006
    What is the ideal practice routine that will maximize improvement?
     
  2. R.A.S.

    R.A.S. Pianissimo User

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    If you have an hour, use Clarke's Technical Studies:
    warmup - #1, #9
    scales - #5
    air flow - #7, #3, #2
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Dear Res,

    Do you have a cheese grater and a box of nails?

    ML
     
  4. resonator

    resonator New Friend

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    Jan 7, 2006
    ???
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Okay, so you didn't get it.

    That was just my way of letting you know that there's no way I can answer a question like that without knowing what your strengths and weaknesses are.

    For example, I have to disagree with RAS, who happens to be a dear friend and Twin Cities colleague of mine, regarding his advice. I disagree because those are all slurred technical studies and your technique may already be just dandy and perhaps you need something else to better yourself.

    ML
     
  6. resonator

    resonator New Friend

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    Jan 7, 2006
    Yes, but i need a balance routine that will deal with all aspects of trumpet playing in which the strengths and weakness can be drawn out or brushed off depending on the situation. Get it? So insted of "15 minutes of clarke #2" it would be "15 minutes of weakness #1". I don't think im making myself clear, but the best way to describe it is an outline of all things that should be worked on, and the amount one should dedicate to each skill depends on the situation. It's 3 am so don't mind the grammar and spelling.
     
  7. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    So, what you want to know is how to create a general practice program that involves the ingredients neccesary to make a complete trumpeter.

    Okay, now I "get it".

    1) A warm up that includes making sounds that are clear and that reactivates the fingers and articulation

    2) Goldman put out a good book for articulation that is a nice extension of the Arban Method

    3) You should be striving to learn all the 14 studies and solos at the back of the Arban method

    4) You should have a working knowledge of the transpositions A, C, D, Eb, F, and E. Use the Sachse book.

    5) Upper lips slurs are good for endurance - page 44 of Arban's bottom of the page

    ML
     
  8. Mr. Stomvi

    Mr. Stomvi Pianissimo User

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    Nov 14, 2003
    Manny - Have you taken a look at the book "Exercises Journaliers" that Vicente Lopez (Maurice Andre student) put out for Maurice ? I would be interested in hearing your thoughts in comparing this work with say Schlossberg's Daily Drills & Tech studies.

    Tanx in advance

    Seth Moore
     
  9. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Seth,

    No, I've not seen it but it sounds appealing to try to find. Thanks for the info.

    ML
     
  10. BradHarrison

    BradHarrison Pianissimo User

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    Oct 31, 2005
    Toronto, Canada
    When you have a limited time to practice you should consider planning your practice throughout the week. Good practice generally involves a warm-up, fundamentals and technique, and working on music(solos, studies, etc.). If you're a jazz player you need to add improv to the list. I don't think you can effectively practice all aspects of the trumpet in an hour a day. However, in 7 hours a week you can probably have a pretty effective routine.

    Warm up happens every day. And, if you're working towards a performance you should probably be working on your music/solos/etc every day. That leaves fundamentals and technique. You may want to work on tonguing, intervals studies, and scales one day and flexibilities, range, and endurance(long tones) another day.

    I hope that gives you some ideas about how to plan your week. The best person to decide your practice schedule is you and the person to help and guide you is your private teacher. Speaking of private teachers, you don't need a lesson every week if you don't have the time or money. Consider a lesson every 2-3 weeks or even once a month.
     

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