Practice sessions-to sit or to stand,that is the question!!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by guitarsrmine, Jan 18, 2011.

  1. ColinWhite

    ColinWhite Pianissimo User

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    I don't think sitting while you play is too much of a handicap breathing-wise. Maybe it does limit you a little bit, but if it were actually that bad, then I don't imagine that symphony players would have done it for the past I-don't-know-how-many hundred years. I prefer to sit when I practice, because it's easier to sit than to stand and that means a longer practice session for me.
     
  2. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Jan 21, 2010
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    I stand most of the time - mainly due to not having a firm chair in my practice room.

    I find it also depends a little on the style of music I'm practicing - my concert brass band and orchestra stuff I tend to sit down for (except at home) but the stage band stuff I need a bit of space to move around in.

    --bumblebee
     
  3. reedy

    reedy Piano User

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    Jul 31, 2009
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    ive always sat down to practice, mainly because I'm lazy but also as it was easier. After performing a solo before Christmas I got really nervous and fell apart on stage :( and was really disappointed in myself, from then on I stood up to practice with the idea if I can practice like that I can stand like. From 3 months of standing up to practice I can now stand for longer on gigs without getting tired and I feel a bit more confident and feel my breathing and posture is much better aswel
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    The only time I have to sit to practice is when I'm working out of Caruso's book. He wants the foot tapping and I can't tap it standing up.

    Turtle
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Stand or sit ... posture, posture, posture for the purpose of optimizing your breathing.

    Tapping the beat with your foot is more often suggested by instructors, and really I am not against it either toe or heel. For concert I've worn looser shoes and used my heel and it would be much more difficult for the audience to discern my tapping. I'm not sure if the heel of my shoe even lifts off the stage surface. More and more I've noted the red light metronomes on performers stands, but a problem exists in synchronizing such among all the performers ... and yet foot tapping has never been synchronized either. Then too, conductors often change tempo some for interpretation/effect, although some composers have also indicated tempo change in their charts.
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I sit for the same reasoning (tired), but it doesn't seem to affect me too much when I sit up straight. I stand for a little while, just to make sure I can play that way, and hopefully to increase my stamina for playing while standing. Sitting helps to remain relaxed for some higher register stuff, when early on in my comeback - I would get "dizzy" standing, but not sitting. But that is slowly working its way to being fixed.
     
  7. hahkeystah

    hahkeystah Piano User

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    Jan 12, 2011
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    one thing i keep in mind, that's stayed with me since my very first teacher is this: when providing air support to the instrument, everyone always thinks about their back and abs. think also about your shoulders. keep them relaxed, and down - adding weight on your lungs and increasing air pressure that way. I don't know if it physically makes a difference, but when you add it to the things you think about, it can make a huge difference, whether standing or sitting. when i applied it to marching, it was like a light when on. Too, it minimizes the difference standing/sitting will have, as well as the direction your horn is pointing. in marching obviously the horn goes all over the place, but adding the shoulders makes all the difference
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Ok - this won't make sense to most people -- But, I agree with the above info. I have noticed when I sit in a chair and lean forward enough roll the shoulders over in front of my body a bit, tilt the bell towards the floor -- I get easyier play on some of the high reg, it's easier -- maybe it sounds better because of reflection off the floor -- BUT the notes are definitely easier - at least for me

    Not sure how I could incorporate that into a stand up gig -- but it seems to work.
    ken
     
  9. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I think my range is a little better standing.

    Turtle
     

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