PRACTICE SESSIONS: What's yours like?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Jun 30, 2010.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Hey thanks everyone, I get the idea. Even when you've reached some magic place of improvising freely, it's still about the songs. Somewhere in this forumn is a list of around 400 jazz standards.... I better get started.

    And yes, Rowuk has a good point, he always does. But I don't agree on the physics or on animal behavior. First let me restate: it's only about an 1/8 of a mile to the spot where the two geese were (probably) looking for a nesting spot. Did they care about the sound of the Mouthpiece? It was immediate and no, they didn't like it. Why would they? At that volume, the MP sounds like a cross between a duck and pterodactyl (or something like that). You should have been here, it was something to see.

    Here's fantasy: "The geese could care less about your MP unless you are sucking eggs with it." How would you have any idea about what these geese are feeling? Have you ever seen a pair of Canadian honkers? Do you know what they sound like? Is there any wildlife where you are??? An authority on trumpet, agreed, but you don't know everything. Get over it.

    And as for sound frequencies over distances, I've heard people talking across a very stlll lake in B.C., a half a mile away. If their voices travel that far, I would imagine a MP could be heard as well. As for an 1/8 of a mile over open grass, I'm sure those geese could hear you clinking your wine glasses on the deck and giggling.

    But hey, wasn't this a post about PRACTICE SESSIONS??? Let's hear some more if people are willing to share.

    Turtle
     
  2. oldgit

    oldgit Pianissimo User

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    Jun 16, 2010
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    Practicing in the school playground today just c major scale within range when a little year one girl (6) came up to me and said.
    your trumpet makes some really nice noises and some really bad ones! Do you mean it to be like that?
    And i said, of course if you dont have the bad ones the good ones dont sound nearly as good.
    Try as i might i havent frightened them away yet.
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    :lol:
     
  4. Ichierzen

    Ichierzen Pianissimo User

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    Sep 22, 2007
    Hmm...well, the OP did ask about typical practice sessions :p so here's what I typically do. I've been playing for about a decade now - since fourth grade and I just finished my fourth year in college.

    I'm planning a couple of trumpet and organ hour-long concerts for the summer, the first of which I've been practicing for - I know all the pieces but I've been trying to play through the entire program from start to finish - playing along with recordings. Anyway, on to what I do.

    The whole program is on Piccolo trumpet - the only time I touch my Bb or C is during concert band on Tuesday nights - and the first piece goes up to a G...I have the F# alright, but can't normally find the G when I reach for it, so I've been trying something Rowuk posted in another thread about increasing range, and so I start on a midstaff G (or topstaff, whichever way you want to think about it) and move up and down chromatically in increasing amounts until reaching the G - sometimes I get it, sometimes not. After about two rounds of that, I put my headphones on and start playing along through the program.

    The two artists I'm mainly playing along to are Maurice Andre and Alison Balsom - for Andre's musicality, and much of Ms. Balsom's, but I want her sound. I play a Stomvi Master, and can get pretty close in a church or a room with good acoustics - but it's just too bright in any room of my house. The program's as follows:

    Adagio in G minor - Giazotto, arr. Defaye, transcribed (Andre)
    Gloria in Excelsis Deo - Anon., transcribed (Andre)
    Concerto in D minor - Marcello/Bach (Balsom)
    Concerto in D minor Op. 9 No. 2 - Albinoni (Andre)
    ~Ten minute break/intermission
    Vocalise - Rachmaninoff (Balsom)
    Concerto in D - Vivaldi/Bach (Balsom)
    Sonate "Prima" - Viviani (Andre)

    It's a lot of music, but that's really what it is in the end - music. I've had a professor tell me that you aren't really ready for a concert until you can play through it twice, so in that aspect, I'm certainly not ready since I can rarely get through it all once. Also, I've been told that it's not the flashy/fast stuff that gets professionals excited, but the slow adagio-like movements that demonstrate control, musicality, concept of sound, etc. So paying special attention to those has been a bit of my top priority so far.

    Anyway, that's my typical pratice session.
     
  5. Trumpet-Golfer

    Trumpet-Golfer Pianissimo User

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    Dec 9, 2008
    Liverpool, England
    I'm into my 5th year playing and I'm 59 years old.
    This is my weekly practice routine:

    Week days:
    10 to 15 mins (before driving to work)
    long tones 2nd line G to C below staff slurred progressing down a semi tone.
    Scales: C, Bb, D, F & G tongued and slurred the appegios tongued & slurred.(F & G low in the staff)
    Intervals (my biggest weakness) using C scale eg: c below staff D, C-E, C-F, C-G as high as I can go with decent tone.

    Lunch time
    20 to 25 minutes
    As above, However scales F & G to the top of and just above the staff (the G just above the staff being the limit of my usable range)
    Music :- 'The Waltons theme, 'The Godfather Theme' which are two of my favourite pieces and exercise the limits of my upper range.
    (change the musical pieces every other day)

    Evening
    30 to 60 minutes
    Warm up with some of my before work stuff
    Play alongs
    Latin jazz Guest Spot: Latin Playalong For Trumpet at Musicroom.com - Sheet Music & Songbooks
    changing every other night
    eg: classical- movie
    Also use Smartmusic as part of my weekly routine.
    I try not to miss a day.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Yup, up close too.
    Yup, up close too.
    Yup. I am about 30 miles outside of Frankfurt, Germany in the country. We have ducks, geese, alster, crows (several different breeds), and enough other types where I don't know the english translation for. They, like most animals all have one thing in common: they avoid humans unless they are close to the nest or their babies.

    I did a research paper on bird calls when in college. The way that they produce tones really interested me. (the canadian honkers were not in the study) The mouthpiece is pretty far away from any bird - from their point of view anyway.
    Nothing to get over. You flipped the bird.......
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    :lol:

    Okay, good one, Rowuk! That is funny.

    As for your expertise on birds, I sit corrected. I think I would be most interested in hearing what a trumpeter swan sounds like. The honkers are, well, not really what you'd call "upper register artists", especially when it's a pair and they're .... what, arguing as they fly???

    And Frankfurt, wow, does that bring back great memories. 15 year old teenager, parents, BIG wine festival. That was the first time I ever got really drunk, chasing my older sister around, trying to keep her out of trouble. What fun that was, we stayed a couple extra days.

    Turtle
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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  9. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Nice! :D

    The original trumpeters? There are some very musical sounds in there, harmonies, etc. Sounds like more than just a conversation ....

    T
     
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Okay, just to follow up here (thanks again Rowuk! and everyone) I went out looking for music books to get SONGS going in my practice.

    Waded through lots of material, and decided to buy THE STANDARDS REAL BOOK, not only because there were many songs I knew, but also because I like the idea of purchasing something that you'll be using from now on, Like the Arbans.

    Added bonus: Fantastic old black and white photographs sprinkled throught the REAL BOOK. These images are absolutely stunning ..... very dark printing (like it should be!) looking like museum quality. A good reason to BUY THE BOOK, rather than looking for a download. Great work SHER co! :play:

    Turtle
     

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