Practice space.....soundproof type

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Ryan in Texas, Aug 18, 2015.

  1. Ryan in Texas

    Ryan in Texas Pianissimo User

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    Aug 12, 2015
    San Antonio
    So, i understand how a practice mute is not a good thing for a newbie such as myself. As such, I will not be using one. I do, however, value my marriage. So, how can I create a quiet practice space? I do not need complete soundproofing, but a lot quieter at least. Probably doing this in my attached garage. :D
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I think if you get a sufficient distance you should be good. As I type this, I'm sitting in my practice space in my basement (actually taking a break at the moment) - a small room that is in the corner of the house, but that has sound attenuating insulation in the ceiling. I used a fiberglass product, but apparently rock wool insulation is better for sound attenuation, and isn't terribly expensive.

    Regarding the marriage, my wife always understood that I was a musician, and I was going to need to practice my trumpet at home, so she has always allowed for that, fortunately.

    In any case, anything that can serve as a baffle between you and the house in the garage will help as well - maybe build another small partition - as long as you've got a certain amount of direct sound being blocked to the inside walls, it's going to quiet things down substantially.
     
  3. Ryan in Texas

    Ryan in Texas Pianissimo User

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    Actually, my wife is incredibly supportive, I just don't want to subject my fam to my "formative" years any more than necessary. I have heard rock wool elsewhere, so I think I will incorporate it.

    Thanks
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    That's great that your wife is supportive of your new hobby. :thumbsup: It makes all the difference in the world! A friend of mine has a wife who seems to do everything she can to discourage his guitar playing, even though in the early years of their marriage, it's how he supported them. I just don't get it - it's one of the few joys he has in life, and she's like Dracula, sucking all of the joy out of it. I feel for the guy.

    I might re-do the ceiling of my drum area with rock wool insulation, and then maybe hang a drop ceiling with sound tiles. The trumpet doesn't really bother the family, but the drums do - I'm not sure what I can do for the bass drum though. That's a low freq vibration that penetrates just about everything.
     
  5. Ryan in Texas

    Ryan in Texas Pianissimo User

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    I deal with vibration professionally, so I know how to attenuate it. I am really looking for stuff people have done successfully in order to eliminate some of the trial and error. And you are correct; low freq is a nightmare to deal with. I think a box slightly larger than your bass drum, placed right in front and lined with insulation, rockwool, acoustic panels, etc.. might work. the key is to make the box form something very rigid, like 3/4 in plywood, otherwise, the box acts like another skin on the drum. maybe hang a couple of moving blankets behind you. It's tough, though, to kill low freq. It destroys machinery....that's what I try to prevent in my job. Another thought...maybe you could put the drum IN the aforementioned box.....:huh:
     
  6. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    My house is pretty small but if I play two rooms away from the family with both doors closed it seems to be alright. Other than that I play when my family are out somewhere, and I play at my workplace at night when there's nobody working there, nor neighbours to worry about.

    --bumblebee
     
  7. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Walk-in closets filled with clothes, bedding, etc. are great practice rooms. I've also used conventional closets by just sticking my horn in between the hanging clothes. A garage, IMO, is worse than playing in one's house. There's almost nothing keeping the sound going out into the neighborhood (if that's a consideration). Other options I've used are parking garages, the wide open spaces. One which I used a long time and which worked out for me well was to practice in a church meeting room. I cut a deal with the church to provide some musical services a couple of times a year in exchange for the key to the room.

    The best is, of course, not available to most folks, including myself now, but in Germany, where there are ordinances allowing professional musicians practicing during designated hours, I lived in a house whose landlady was a former Soviet opera singer and her tolerance level for my playing and teaching was very high, for some reason (cultural maybe?) the entire neighborhood had no problem with me and that was daily for hours at a time.

    This is totally off-topic, but I'll share if for anyone who might like the anecdote. One of the moments I will always cherish for the rest of my life occurred at a Christmas time, when my landlady had rented out our unfinished basement to a folk music band from Belarus, which was on tour. One evening, I had my stereo blaring with play-along backgrounds improvising jazz, downstairs was the folk band rehearsing their ethnic songs, and next to me was my landlady singing songs with piano for an upcoming recital. It was a wonderful cacophony. Just a beautiful way to live your life.
     
  8. jengstrom

    jengstrom Pianissimo User

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    I don't know how much effort you'd like to put in here, but I constructed a 6'x6' booth. It is made of 2' wide sections, using std. 2x4 construction, covered with drywall, and insulated. I connected the sections with strips of 3/8 plywood which cover the seams. The booth is about 7' high. The roof is made the same way as the sides. One of the side sections is hinged and serves as a door. It has lights and I ran an extension cord into it so I could power my laptop.

    This is a good weekend project and costs less than $200. While not completely soundproof, it works well enough that probably no one in the house could hear you if this was in the garage. Mine is in the basement. I can go downstairs after everyone goes to bed and not bother anybody. Best, of all, if you move it can be disassembled and taken with you. I've done it.

    Pretty, no. Effective, yes.

    -John
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    John, I've given thought to doing a similar thing for my drums in the basement. Trumpet has never been a problem, but I know that the drums can be pretty annoying. The unfortunate thing is that when I have a "gig" coming up on drums (pro bono church related stuff) it still needs to be practiced, but finding times where I can do that and not annoy at least one person in the house is a real challenge.

    Ryan, that booth idea sounds like a pretty good idea, depending on what you budget looks like and whether or not you are the handy type who can do those kinds of things.
     
  10. Tomaso

    Tomaso Pianissimo User

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    A guy I know found a distributer of cardboard egg cartons and bought a gang of them. He sliced the lids off, leaving only the bottom portion with its little egg cups.
    He glued these on his practice room walls and achieved the driest, deadest room I ever "heard", almost like those professional silent chambers.
    In any event, not much resonance but a really sound proof practice space where you can hear every nuance of sound the horn makes.

    T/
     

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