Practice today?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpethack, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    TH,

    Sorry... that's about all I know about Sergei. I learned that from Lew Soloff last time he was in town, so, I can't even claim credit for really knowing!

    ML
     
  2. trpt2345

    trpt2345 Mezzo Forte User

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    May 21, 2006
    Morelia, Mexico
    Ah, I feel so much better that you do Goldman 1 and 2 at 100, I can't go much faster than that (maybe 104 at best and usually settle for 100, even though the metronome marking is higher.

    Michael McLaughlin

    Why shouldn't truth be stranger than fiction? Fiction, after all, has to make sense.
    Mark Twain
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Well, truth be told... that's where I start and eventually work up during the course of a session to about 112-116 once I'm warm AND I don't have to go to rehearsal (in other words, when I have more time). That's why I like 148 of the Arban's, because I like to build speed with my single tongue with that page.

    ML
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2007
  4. trumpethack

    trumpethack Pianissimo User

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    Massachusetts
    Manny,

    When you do Arban's 148 at those tempos (104-108-112), do you do the whole page at 104, then the whole page at 112...etc.? Thanks for the insight.

    Matt
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    There's an old thread somewhere about a game I used to play where you begin the first line at 104 and the next at 105, etc. until you reach the bottom line and you should be somewhere around 117. You take a 10-30 second rest in beteen each line or just enough time to reset the metronome.

    ML
     
  6. trumpethack

    trumpethack Pianissimo User

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    I like it! Thanks.

    -M
     
  7. Ralph

    Ralph Pianissimo User

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    Jan 27, 2005
  8. trpt2345

    trpt2345 Mezzo Forte User

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    Lately I have been doing something I did years back on a suggestion from a colleague at Eastman, John Krueger from Kenosha, Wisconsin. I hauled out the C trumpet and have been playing Goldman, Smith, Brandt and Clarke etc. on C instead of Bb, with the Bach 1 1/2 C. Like swinging a heavy bat, you go back to the Bb and wow, everything pops out.

    Michael McLaughlin

    Information is not knowledge.
    Albert Einstein
     
  9. Shermock

    Shermock New Friend

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    Dec 12, 2006
    Maple Grove, MN
    Yeah! I've been doing the same thing lately... Charlier, etc. on C. Also, I've been transposing solo material like the Haydn and Hummel to C just for the sheer "brain strain" of it all. Makes performing/practicing on the more appropriate instrument just that much easier. And it's teaching me about playing "lighter" on the big horns (Bb, C) a la the Eb or D. This helps a lot for playing as the only trumpet in a small chamber orchestra, as I tend to feel a bit too "large" on most of the stuff they're doing. (Waistline not withstanding...) :lol:

    Makes a bombastic jobbing date feel like heaven!:D

    Have a great day!

    Shermock
     
  10. talcito

    talcito Piano User

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    Feb 18, 2004
    Both the gentleman I study with and I have similar feelings about the "Goldman Book".........It should come with some sort of warning like "Simple exercises but if overdone will be bad for your health".

    Its kind of strange, whenever I over practice from the Goldman I feel real stiff the next day, yet I could practice out of a book like Smith's "Top Tones' all day long and feel great the next day......weird?

    I have been practicing #15 daily for several years(legato tongue and as written) and found it very beneficial in finding out where my chops are that day. I've been told #27" Cavatina" was the "try out" exerpt to get into the Goldman Band.

    Thank you for your ideas, Manny.
     

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