Practice today?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpethack, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    Isn't life a funny thing? I began my session similarly (after a warm-up), based on what you did yesterday, plus a few of the double tongue studies. (I'm working artics). So, thanks Manny!

    Then, someone brought the fudge in...oh, man...leadpipe police are on their way...quick! Get a snake!
     
  2. JunkyT

    JunkyT Pianissimo User

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    Jan 6, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    Differing leadpipe sanitation issues aside, I love this thread! It's like our own on-line practice journal.

    I just started journalling recently, after having been told the benefits for years. I finally got over my laziness (and fear of actually committing to something!) and gave it a shot, and I'm hooked. I find my practice sessions to be much more focused and effective, and my time away from the horn I find myself thinking about what I've written and what I want to do in the next session.

    Let's keep this thread going.

    This morning I started with some breathing exercises and leadpipe buzzing for about 5 minutes each, just to get my focus back and my body and chops feeling loose. Then I did longtones with a "spider" approach from middle-line G up and down an octave. After a short break, I did the Caruso 6 notes and Stamp longtone exercise. Short break and some Clarke #2, at first starting with keys I'm comfortable in and then a few I'm not so comfortable in.

    I'm going to take a break, do some cleaning, have lunch, and then dive into some flex studies of some sort, and then do some transcribing.
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    The following took place between 9:30 and 11:00:

    Once again, today was another focus on the Arban book and what I iike to call "The Forgotten Arban". It is my opinion that there is a host of exercises in Arban's method that are rarely, if ever, played because people just don't find them that interesting at first glance.

    I started off with some zigzagging long tones and went to my Marriage of Figaro finger exercise after a few chromatics. My articulation after all that slurring started on page 12, #9 each very slowly on one breath and no louder than piano. Then pp. 14-15, and progressing to moderately fast speeds. I made the decision not to play louder than mf for the whole session. I was developing the purest tone at the quietest dynamic I could.

    I went to an exercise that Mel Broiles made up for us to perfect grace notes. Go to p.108-9. What you're going to do is take #'s 50, 48, and 52 and play them in that order... without interruption! What you have as a result is a lovely three-part study that is very enjoyable and instructive. You'll have to turn the last note of 48 into a 16th to make it flow into 52.

    I turned on the metronome and decided to do whatever I did after that at whatever the fastest tempo indicated for any given study.

    Next was p.111-2 for more slurs at mm.=152 as marked. Now, here's one of those studies people don't play anymore: p.117, #76. Set the metronome to 120 as marked and you'll be treated to a great study for subdivision and phrasing. I followed that with #87 at mm=88.

    Okay, now it gets hard.

    Go to pp.127-8 and do those two at the markings of 88 and 80 to the quarter respectively. Yes, take breaks when it all starts to go kaput. But here's the rule: if you crash because you missed a fingering you have to go back and play it right. If a note just goes to air or it splits a little just go on. The concern is to at least try to play all the right notes.

    I was inspired by our new friend Lior (Concertgebuow) to practice the triplet exercise on p.135. It's tougher than it looks if you observe the metronome markings!

    The rest of my time was slur two,tongue two double tonguing exercises and some solos from the back.

    I have two rehearsals later on so...

    lunch!

    ML
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Okay, go grab your Arban book.

    Page 20, #46.

    Set the metronome to about 120 to the half note. No airballs. Not a one. No wrong notes. If you play a wrong note you must play the affected line three times until you know it. Then, go back to the top. One airball and you go right back to the beginning irrespective of right notes.

    Go.

    Oh, by the way, you can't spend more than 10 minutes doing this. You have to stop and/or go do something else.

    ML
     
  5. ROGERIO

    ROGERIO Mezzo Forte User

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    Sep 30, 2004
    PHOENIX, AZ
    Manny,

    Okay. Because of this I'm going to be the biggest trumpet geek in my office. Wait, I'm the only trumpet geek in my office...

    I'm bringing my Arban to work so I can look these things up...
     
  6. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    Northern New York
    Ouch. My brain hurts. In a good way. Great sight reading practice! (It's hard NOT to spend more than 10 minutes!)
     
  7. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    I have a day job so my time is limited but I did play it.
    I just couldn't keep starting over
     
  8. JunkyT

    JunkyT Pianissimo User

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    Jan 6, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    Thanks for posting that, Manny! Great exercise.

    It's funny, because I don't remember that one, even though there's a check next to it in my book, which means that my very first teacher had me playing it when I was 9 years old!

    I also noted the absence of an X through the check, which clearly indicates he never felt I mastered it!

    Ah well...back to the shed...
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2007
  9. Richard Oliver

    Richard Oliver Forte User

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    Casper, WY
    It is one of "those" most certainly.

    As to hairballs,

    [​IMG]


    Richard
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2007
  10. Snorglorf

    Snorglorf Pianissimo User

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    Nov 13, 2008
    EDIT: didn't read the original post. at all.


    I read the rest of the thread though, good stuff!
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2008

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