Practice with a cold

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Labidochromis, Mar 6, 2009.

  1. soloft

    soloft New Friend

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    Jan 14, 2009
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    Keep practicing the fingerings, that is key. However, use the lyrical exercises a lot. Sing it out loud or in your head. It doesn't matter so much if you sign it well, as long as you can start to develop good phrasing habits and making it sound pretty. If you can sing it, you can play it.
    Also, if you want to keep lung strength up a bit, keep blowing. don't actually play, but practice your breathing. Try acting like you are playing (using your air, proper fingerings, even keep your lips set as if you were playing) and do that. Obviously, if you get a headache, stop.
    Best of luck to you.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The pencil and just fingering the valves are 2 good ways to advance even when other conditions are problematic. Light buzzing with the mouthpiece can also help - no force. Antihistamines really change the way you experience your chops. Try to avoid them if you can. Hydration is the best medicine! Soup, unsweetened tea and plain tap water.
     
  3. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    I agree unless you have to pay the rent from playing, don't play. the rest won't hurt you and and you'll get well quicker. Playing just packs the congestion in, esp. in your ears
     
  4. spit_valve

    spit_valve New Friend

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    A variation of the subject.. I recommend to my students that they sanitize their horns after an illness. At the very least the mouthpiece.
     
  5. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    you said that playing with a cold could pack congestion in your ears I played with a cold /cough would this affect my hearing or will it go away when my cold is gone ,I am concerned because my hearing isnt that good and I always have ringing in my ears (tinitus ) I know I should not have practiced with a cold but I messed up I am a comeback player and I have been practicing everyday for about four month and I didnt want to miss a day .I also have a trumpet lesson tomorrow .Thanks you for any help ,Anthony
     
  6. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    practicing with a cold

    Please excuse me if I have this post in twice ,I have a cold/cough and I think I may have messed up by practicing the trumpet .Because I didnt read the other post on Not TO PLAY when you have a cold .Someone mentioned that it packs the ears with fluids and NOW I am really concerned cause my hearing is not too good to begin with and I also have ringing in my ears (tinitus) for a long time ,the thing is I am a come back player have been practicing for almost four months and I didnt want to miss practicing ,but now having read how playing with a cold could mess up your hearing I am worried ,last time I had a bad cold my ears were stuffed up and then I was not even playing the trumpet ,any help or input would be much appreciated ,Thank you ,Anthony
     
  7. Wlfgng

    Wlfgng Piano User

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    When I am sick I do not practice. I spend my time focusing in on recovery from the illness. The trumpet can wait.
     
  8. nosray

    nosray Pianissimo User

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    Aug 28, 2008
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    That is very true. When you go scuba diving, a common way of unpopping your ears due to pressure is blowing out of your nose while you are pinching your nose. That will create an area of high pressure in your sinuses, and eventually match the pressure on the outside, that the water is providing. If you can't blow out of your nose or mouth and keep on blowing, it could really affect your ear drums. Try not to play on the trumpet, but lightly buzz on the mouthpiece.
     

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