Practice

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mamboman, Dec 31, 2011.

  1. Mamboman

    Mamboman Pianissimo User

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    NSW Australia
    Hello everybody

    i was going to post a thread about practice i.e:

    -Should i write down and follow a list of what my practice routine should be
    - should i just have it memorised?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. TrumpetMonk

    TrumpetMonk Pianissimo User

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    You'll memorize the patterns of most simple things in a few weeks of doing them. Etudes or musical excerpts will take some more time.
     
  3. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I find that writing out a schedule is helpful to remind you to keep on track. It also shows you progression as you change your schedule to accommodate your gains.
     
    tedh1951 likes this.
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    But the schedule needs to be periodically updated to reflect your mastery of the practice. If you don't push yourself to increase (range, style, tonguing, musicality, etc.) then I am afraid you will reach a point where progress is not happening, and you just "maintain" where you are at!!!!!!
     
  5. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Completely agree. Always challenge yourself! Makes it fun.
     
  6. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    My band teacher always told my when doing a work out on my own, to put a scale in that has a note that I can't play in it, do it till it's right. If you aren't progressing towards something you will remain a stagnant player!
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    or perhaps better yet --- is to practice (in the staff) all those scales that you CAN do, and keep playing them over and over, until you can't play them with good tone. In the staff practicing is good to develop endurance, and actually increase your range (as it helps to develop your embouchure muscles without straining them by AIMING for notes that stress your embouchure) -- I know that seems counter-intuitive, but in the staff, and softly helps develop a strong embouchure, and increases endurance and range.
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Personally, at some time during each of my practice sessions I play ascending and descending chromatic scales with different note values, different articulations, and different volume. I've both my portable battery powered and my AC tuners in my eyesight to evaluate my ability. I've found when battery power is low, my portable is faulty.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I write the lesson material down for my students. Seldom do we go back to "check progress". If I am doing my job, and they are doing theirs, we have no doubts!
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    A syllabus (lesson plan) isn't of itself a bad thing unless it is thrown at you by the school administration usually with the accompaning statement something like: "This is the way we've always presented the subject and the way we want it presented now." There just isn't wiggle room this way to address the needs of a student "one on one".

    My take is that the learning abilities of individuals are as varied as their appearance. I've not yet known a public school system that provides the requirement of an annual comprehensive exam by a medical Doctor in the specialties of audiology and opthamalogy, vis hearing and sight. I'm not sayin' it is not possible for a musician to be unable to hear or see but such are indeed a rareity ... but I don't believe any who are without these would tell you they couldn't have achieved quicker and better had they had they had their hearing and sight.

    Yes, with a passion we always promote practice and academic homework , but there is no concern given by the public school system in the sociology of a student being able to do so optimally. A public school instrumental music teacher confronts the dilemma of many student putting aside their own instrumental music development sooner or later, most when they graduate high school and turn in the school provided instrument, not to say many long before that don't ... even to the extent of quitting school entirely.

    No, as a tutor, presently tutoring 4 beginning 5th graders on trumpet, at present I'm not now speculating that even the one boy that has his own trumpet, a Bach Strad, will continue playing it beyond high school ... but I do hope so and foresee no rationale why he can't ... if he himself wants to. It's futile for us to try or say anything as will change the future of another when they don't want to do what we present.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012

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