Practicing Rhythm Changes

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SmoothOperator, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 14, 2010
    I have been practicing rhythm changes like this. On each three note chord playing 1 3 5 3 one note per beat and on each four note chord 1 3 5 7 one note per beat, repeating for two bar phrases. I am extending this to the different keys C, Bb, F etc. The slurs seem to help my technique plus, I am learning the infamous chord change. Sometimes, during the bridge I sharp the root to get that nice diminished descending sound. I also practice the melody lines.

    Two questions:

    1) I am still so slow compared to the melody, is there a good way to speed these up.

    2) People would seldom play those chords on trumpet as they are, what is the next step to jazzing them up?
     
  2. LEBOUTILLIER

    LEBOUTILLIER New Friend

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    Apr 1, 2011
    Iowa
    I started by playing diminished 7th arpeggios ascending up one, and down the next chromatically. F#-A-C-Eb, then down E-C#-A#-G. I will generally slur them, and usually with a swing rhythm. It helped me get the chords under my fingers before I got the the lead sheets.
     
  3. Byfbo96

    Byfbo96 New Friend

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    May 15, 2011
    Jacksonville, FL
    What do you mean "speed these up"? If you are referring to playing the melody @ tempo then my suggestion would be to practice it slow and gradually increase the tempo. Do this over and over again until you can play the line at the desired tempo. In addition, memorize the line!!

    What do you mean "people would seldom play those chords on trumpet"? Jazz solos are full of lines made up of only chord tones. Find some transcriptions and discover this your self, or better yet, transcribe some easier solos (Miles Davis - summertime, Freddy the Freeloader, So What) and discover what he is doing.

    Another suggestion is to learn the chord scales or modes. These are scales that are played over wcertain chord when they are sounded, i.e mixolydian scale for a Dominant 7th chord (that is the fifth in the key) If you are not familiar with these terms ask your teacher and/or pick up a Jamey Aebersold book. Those are awesome referrences!! Good Luck!!:play:
     
  4. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 14, 2010
    I see up the arpegio then half step down and finishing the arpegio. How do you swing them? Like F#-AA-CC-EbEb or F#-F#A-AC-EbE or some-other way?
     
  5. LEBOUTILLIER

    LEBOUTILLIER New Friend

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    I had to swing them because I was (still am) very bad at feeling the swing rhythms in jazz. So, I used these exercises to become more comfortable, and to internalize the feel.
     
  6. chapmand

    chapmand Piano User

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    Jul 26, 2010
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Write out the 3rd and the 7th for each chord. For starters these can be your focus notes. Play them as half or quarter notes depending on the time allowed. Walking between these tones then can give you a start for improv. Look for common tones between chords and keep your key signature or the key of the moment in mind as you move.
     
  7. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 14, 2010
    I did that for the bridge, do people typically add 7ths in the verse/chorus parts? I know the sharp IV gets a diminished sixth.

    IE

    I I IV #IV6 I I V V
     
  8. LEBOUTILLIER

    LEBOUTILLIER New Friend

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    I misread the previous post about 'how', not 'why' I swing the arpeggios. In answer to that, I play them all with eighth notes, and swing them (I try to think in terms of triplets, 2+1) and establish the feel.
     
  9. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 14, 2010

    Ah I see one bar is. |C--E-G--E-C--E-G--E-| with the notes followed by -- being played longer?
     
  10. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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