Practicing Scales WITHOUT trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jellesmiecht, Jul 24, 2012.

  1. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Sorry, Branson, unless I'm misunderstanding you, I don't see the logic in this at all.

    My comments about fingering (no mention of blowing simultaneously BTW) are muscle-memory and coordination exercises. Such exercises have been used widely, not only for trumpet players, but for pianists, recorder players, etc to good effect for a very long time. I just don't understand the "waste of time" comment.

    Just as in sports, isolating individual components of the whole of playing an instrument allows the person to concentrate on just one aspect without the distractions and perhaps the tensions caused when doing it all at the same time.

    Additionally, the context of the OP's question is practicing scales without the trumpet.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2012
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Simply forget it. You do not learn to play the trumpet without the instrument. Quality and shape of each tone are learned by DOING. Once that you are very accomplished, you can get by on occasion with mutes. Until you are accomplished, you need to play by the rules. There is NOTHING more miserable than a wimpy trumpet player. THAT is what you learn without the horn.
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    My solution is cheaper .... Build a shed.

    I just had a long conversation with my neighbor across the street, and over one house .... She had NO IDEA that I played the trumpet. Wow, I've been wailing on that thing for a couple of years now and she's never heard it. My neighbor directly across the street heard it before I built the shed and told me that she MISSED my practicing (her son played trumpet, so it's a personal thing).

    You might be surprised what your neighbors DON'T hear. If they're not complaining, maybe there's no reason for them to.


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2012
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    my neighbors can't hear me play the trumpet --- even if I play loud --- then again, I have a stone house with 3 foot thick basement walls --- some of my neighbors said that was "overkill" when I was building the place, after all what kind of CRAZY GUY builds a house like that???? -- but they don't complain about any noise!!!!!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I have seen your house from google earth. You house of stone is more than a stones throw away from the nearest neighbor (who looks like the live in the next county). By the way, those sheep out there in the pasture think you're a baaaaaad dude.
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    HEY, nobody mentioned how close a neighbor is, or has to be to hear the trumpet --- nonetheless OP --- you got to play along with the fingers.
    EVERYTHING has to work together ---- you have to have face to mpc time.
     
  7. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    That's a pretty dogmatic statement. I'm even having problems tying it with the OP's question. I'm not sure how tone has anything to do with his predicament, for example.

    If you are saying that it's a waste of time to do fingering patterns on your horn without blowing it, that flies in the face of a heck of a lot of tradition. You can't play your horn all the time, even if you have the facilities to do so. Until one gets to a certain level of playing, your chops just won't hold out that long. But your fingers will and I see no downside to finger exercises, sans blowing. I've seen wind players all my life working out problematic passages with just their fingers and the horn, no blowing.

    Furthermore, the OP is not asking for the optimum way to practice scales. He is asking how he can practice them when he can't play his horn because his chops have given out and when he feels that he's overstayed his playing "visit" with his neighbors. Surely you are meaning to communicate something different than I am reading in your post.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2012
  8. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I totally agree with kehaulani.

    As sometimes happens, some of the participants on this thread may be stuck on certain aspects of the discussion, and may be missing certain truisms. I realize some people are afraid the OP will only do finger exercises and not practice. I think this fear is unfounded, and the OP never said this.

    I often finger through scales and other patterns while holding my trumpet (but not blowing it). This is part of my regular practice. In addition, I finger through patterns on my leg when I'm out-and-about and have some time to kill. This is in addition to my regular playing, of course.

    I'm sure many of us do this.

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2012
  9. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    There are very simple solutions. When I first started learning scales, I thought it was near impossible to learn so many. Like the OP, in the beginning of my comeback, I had a limited amount time before my chops gave out and I wanted to do as much as possible.

    So, at first, I started memorizing the finger patterns with my right hand fingers taping them out on the knuckles of my left hand. I did this when I could during the day, and would do as many patterns as I could while trying to fall asleep --- much better than counting sheep.

    As my chops started getting stronger, I added a second practice session at night using the Silent Brass System. I would do just the scales at night with all articulations. If you stick to one octave, you do not have to go high and your chops will still feel good when you finish. Also, a second practice session will really build your chops. Rowuk is right in as much as the only thing that builds your chops for playing is.... "playing". I agree with the other poster that other resistive methods simply do not translate well to playing. It is all about the specifity of training.

    At any rate, you could blow through the major scales in about 20 minutes once you have it down pat. Now, after about a year of this, it serves as a good warm-up before I go over repertoire. My teacher now wants me to start memorizing Clark II, so I will work that in with each associated scale pattern. If you take things gradually and build, it can work for you. It is not all or nothing. Enjoy :-)

    BrotherBACH
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2012
  10. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    Oh. Before I forget. Chase Sanborn would recommend fingering the scale patterns between exercises to make sure you rest as much as you play.

    BB
     

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