Practicing with other people

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by audwey11, Feb 2, 2016.

  1. Sidekick

    Sidekick Mezzo Piano User

    611
    311
    Apr 14, 2011
    London UK
    There will be a tendency for your Dad to want to lead and explain to you how things work, because he is your Dad and generally that is his role in life. But from the sound of things he's a good guy and will want to encourage you to develop your own style, so I am guessing that it wouldn't take much for him to see this.

    If you and your Dad have different practice styles, you could suggest that you sometimes take the lead in the practice sessions or that you alternate between who leads. (I don't know if there is a significant difference between your playing abilities / levels and this will have a big impact on what is appropriate. Equally I don't know how often you and your Dad practice together, but I imagine that it is pretty regularly.

    Also go with some solo practice and the duets approach as already suggested.

    Talk to him, he's your Dad, he'll get it, even if he looks slightly crest fallen at first.
     
  2. audwey11

    audwey11 Pianissimo User

    168
    91
    Dec 1, 2015
    Maine
    There isn't a significant difference in ability, though he does occasionally state that I have better tone than him! However, we have (about) the same range, I can consistently hit about a c to a d.
     
  3. Sidekick

    Sidekick Mezzo Piano User

    611
    311
    Apr 14, 2011
    London UK
    In that case, go for the duets and talk to him about you sometimes taking the lead in the practice sessions.

    It must be pretty special to share an interest like this with your Dad, learning together and enjoy it - even though sometimes you'll find him really frustrating... he's your Dad, that bit is part of his job too!
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,127
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    You know, in my youth I use to think this way too. Then I joined a band in college as a chemistry major.

    The band played 4 nights a week (three of them school nights) were I would get in at 2 am and have to get up to be at 7:30 am classes. But I was invincible and thought I could do it all. At graduation, I had below a 2.0 average. Took me three tries to get into medical school, but in the end, it made me a better person, as I had to bust my butt to turn around academics with 4 years of grad school. I continued in music throughout this tie as well, as it was a part of me. It all worked out for the best. So 40 years later, I have an MD, PhD and consider myself a damned good musician. Did I ever feel guilty? No, not then or even today. It made me a stronger better person, as a scientist, physician and musician. Would I have done it any differently? No. So go with you passion and desires. Things have a way of working out if you have the passion.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,127
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Finally, practicing with other people is a sure fire way to grow... again as a musician, scientist or physician. There is so much more you can learn from other peoples styles. I am committed to this still today. I practice duets with a good friend I have here on TM (fortunately he lives only a street over from me). We both grow from this experience. I spent 8 years running practice sessions and sectionals with a middle school band up until when I move out of the district a year or so ago. Working with those youthful musicians also gave me the opportunity to grow. I am a better music teacher as a result. So yes, practicing with other people is essential and is one other factor that has optimized success in all my careers. So practice with as many people as possible in as many areas of your life as possible.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
     
  7. audwey11

    audwey11 Pianissimo User

    168
    91
    Dec 1, 2015
    Maine
     

Share This Page