Practicing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by The Obscure One, May 4, 2009.

  1. The Obscure One

    The Obscure One New Friend

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    Hi I'd personally like suggestions on what to practice. I don't mean that in the sense that I'm totally clueless on what to practice but rather that I practice a lot and want more suggestions on what to practice. (Because I feel that I can never practice too much.) To give you an idea of what I do normally here are some of the things I practice or work on: clarke studies;scales; various single tounging exercises; arban triple tounging exercises; arban double tounging exercises; arban lip trills (Ex pg 44); pedal tones; lip slurs; school jazz pieces; Carnival of Venice (I personally feel that's in its own category); occasional piccolo trumpet playing; Occasional sight reading of either random Arban pages, Clarke charecteristic studies, or songs I've heard in The Real Book; Playing from my Real Book which is also known as transposition (I ordered a used Real Book from Amazon and got a C version instead of the Bb one I ordered but kept it because I hate waiting for shipping and thought it would be a healthy challenge.);and lastly something(s) that I can't remember at the moment. I've always had bad memory:huh:. I would greatly appreciate suggestions and look forward to hearing all of your advice.
     
  2. Bachstul

    Bachstul Mezzo Forte User

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    Practice the difficult, articulate exercises, and sight reading when you're alert; practice the boring stuff, long tones, crescendo, diminuendo when you're fatigued.

    Remember at times to close the books, turn off the music stand light, turn on that audio recorder, and see what your trumpet will play for you, from all that practicing, you just might surprise yourself, and be glad you have it, your own work, recorded, to build further on.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Dumb question: how can we know what you can and can't play? How do we know how thorough you are with each of the topics that you mentioned?

    Once we are no longer "beginners", we have to analyse our own playing, take measure of what we can't play and take steps to improve in those areas. As each persons development is individual, what comes next is based on what we just accomplished.

    If your present routine does not give you the desired results, there can be a couple of reasons: routine not adequate, practice sessions too superficial, sessions not regular enough.

    Just grabbing a book to practice without having the background of WHY that book is special, is just face time. If you have no specific goal when playing an etude, it is just face time. A complete waste of time in my opinion.

    What is missing in most routines is enough music. At least 1 third of your practice time should be on tunes.

    You seem to have enough books. If YOUR results are not adequate, I would look in the mirror before adding more paper!
     
  4. Rushtucky

    Rushtucky Pianissimo User

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    You seemed to be an advanced player, an assumption that I am going to make. Therefore, I am going to recommend 5 (five) books that will test your skills, which is what you want. Always attempt to play that which is harder each day.

    Book #1: Develop Sight Reading
    by Gaston Dufresne

    Great book for working on sight reading skills. This is very technical in nature and will definately stimulate, coordinate and stablize your physical and mental reflexes.

    Book #2: Max Schlossberg - Daily Drills & Techical Studies for Trumpet

    This book goes from easy exercises to the difficult and challenging. I highly recommend.

    The last three books are a set for intermeditate to advanced students. The books should be used together, especially book# 1 and book# 2.

    These are the Allen Vizzuitti Trumpet Method Books

    Book#1: Technical Studies
    Book#2: Harmonic Studies
    Book#3: Melodic Studies

    I came across these books a few years ago while visiting Indiana University. I have used them extensively and found them to be invaluable. Each book has it's own explaination for usage and personal development.

    Developing a practice routine is a personal thing and gets more difficult as you advance in your skill level. Arban's and Clark are basic standards that can not be replaced. Keep using them until you have mastered each page with ease. Get and play classical music which will test your skills and are more fun than purging method books everyday.

    Most of all...have fun when you practice. Make it enjoyable!
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2009
  5. The Obscure One

    The Obscure One New Friend

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    To Rowuk

    Well I didn't really mean to potray myself as somebody who was asking advice to make up for shortcomings in regards of practice; I merely wanted a few helpful suggestions. I in no way feel that my results are innadequate and I feel that I've made vast amounts of progress in recent times and that I'm constantly improving.

    But I totaly agree with you Rowuk that a player should analyze his own playing and work on that which ails him most. In fact I tried telling that to this one kid I knew. He was one of those cats who got caught up in range and nothing else. I kept telling him that he should balance out his playing but he wouldn't listen to my advice. Anyways, around the time he had to audition for colleges none of them would take him because he had bad intonation and a poor tone. So he quit trumpet. It's sad but he just gave up after that.

    But I can assure you that I practice regularly and always try to better myself and that's why I started this thread. Because I just wanted some advice on how to better myself from the experience of others in order to keep proggressing.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Then tell us where you need to focus and why. What to practice is insignificant when we do not have a goal set. While "just getting better" could be misconstrued as a goal, it is smaller tasks that lead to improvement.

    For the player without specific focus, it makes no difference if we choose Clarke, Arban, St. Jacome, Irons, Bitsch, Concone, Hering, Dauverné, Reinhardt, Anderson, Sachs, Bolvin, Rubank, Vizzutti, Schlossberg or Mickey Mouse. All of those methods have playing in them and if we concentrate enough, something will improve. If we want to practice more efficiently (better results for the same energy expended), then we focus, based on our experience and understanding.

    I have a pretty big library of methods, but only really use 4 books. It is HOW you practice and not as much WHAT. My experience is that the iPod full of music does not lead to greater appreciation. Collecting books will not positively influence your playing. You need to focus on the books and draw out the essence. That makes for very LEAN and MEAN practice sessions - with results!
     
  7. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    check wynton marsalis practice routine on the web
     
  8. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    What ever you practice make sound musical , be it scales, slurs, long tones,exercises and especially etudes they should all be pleasant to listen to, remember the trumpet is a musical instrument .
     
  9. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Do you have a good teacher? Someone to help you build on your weaknesses and refine your strenghts. Some one to help you organize your practicing
     
  10. The Obscure One

    The Obscure One New Friend

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    I like some of the advice I've been hearing. And yes I do have a good teacher. Does anyone have any good advice on how to reduce mouthpiece pressure?
     

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