Pressure - A real challenge

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JNINWI, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Pressure - A real challenge or THE challenge

    I’ve read, studied, talked and practiced tons about “No Pressure”, had lessons from some world class pro’s, and have been applying the principles for 4 years now, and I finally play very lightly on the mouthpiece no matter where I am on the horn. It took a loooooong time for that to go into muscle memory, (bad habits are hard to break) and Lots and Lots and Lots of practice to get my set correct to accept the new approach to the mouthpiece without interfering with my work chops. For years I said “Oh yeah I don’t use pressure” But now I realize how much I really did. I had to look in a mirror and ask myself, "Do you use more pressure than you think you do ? " It’s a good thing my lead pipe finger hook had a good solder job ! That was my start...
    I got to wondering, how many of you REALLY take no pressure serious, ( I know we ALL take it serious because we all know the consequences of pressure) but systematically WORK at reducing it. How is it going with it ? Run into any problems with the change ? Hardest part, easiest part. To me it was the key that unlocked MANY doors to playing this horn “Mechanically” correct, and there’s no returning after you change, ever. Those of you that have know what I mean. ;-)
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2011
  2. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Good post. I take reducing pressure seriously .... It doesn't take long in this forumn to discover that too much pressure is not only bad it can lead to problems, like pain and careers ending too early. I've been following the postings (especially Rowuk's) about this issue pretty carefully.

    I've gone through several changes that helped with this ..... The first one, nearly a year ago, involved a lot of pressure and puffing cheeks. I solved it with the help of my teacher, who told me to get a small mirror and put it on the music stand (to help me get rid of all the excess work my face was doing). It looked like I was in pain when I played ..... geez. Getting my face under control was the first step. Then, I stopped using the pinky ring.

    Next, I bought a Monette Prana mouthpiece, which as you may know, works well with a relaxed, easy approach ..... which I didn't really have but have evolved into. The Prana keeps me honest. Next, came a smaller bore trumpet (Connstellation), that, along with the Prana, demanded an even more relaxed approach to the embouchure. Each step is a step more relaxed.

    I'd like to hear how others have managed to reduce pressure.:play:

    Turtle
     
  3. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Mirrors are great tools !! I use 3 of them so when I stand in a certain place I see all views of what my body is doing when I play.
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    It was a shock to see what my face looked like a year ago ...... Like I was screaming out some jazz licks, in a high register (actually it was a simple scale). Now, I look like I actually enjoy what I'm doing.

    Reminds me of something my Dad told me many years ago .... "You don't have to do everything like you're killing snakes.":lol:

    Turtle
     
  5. schleiman

    schleiman Piano User

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    Hahahaha! Your dad sounds awesome!
     
  6. Maurito Sosa

    Maurito Sosa New Friend

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    My teacher sometimes give me this exercice that I find awfully hard, but its one to help releasing the pressure:
    you put the trumpet in the palm of your and than play a c, than a g, than the c in the staff, and try to go higher. The thing is that, since the trumpet is in your palm, and you´re not really holding it, you can´t use pressure at all...
    My teacher´s teacher, used to have a hook hanging on his room, in wich he would hang his trumpet and do the same thing... It is so damn hard!
     
  7. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    I've found I use very little pressure, If I consciously note it which doesn't happen that often as I generally just blow.

    When I was beginning I compensated for a weak embouchure with tons of pressure which just fatigued me and severely restriced my range.

    Now, part of my warm up routine is to play 20 minutes very softly, as quiet as I can. This I could not do with much pressure.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Pressure almost doesn't matter.

    When we start out, we are invincible. Pressure is the way that we first get range before our bodies are trained to do what is necessary. Those that get serious, learn a bit about body use and breathing and the pressure thing reduces without all of the BS. The more that the player sensibly practices, the better the body pieces fit together and the easier job that we have.

    Trumpet is a WIND instrument not weightlifting. Get the WIND part right and the rest just needs hundreds to thousands of repetitions.

    Any time that a player starts isolating one area of their playing, they miss most of what is really necessary - the BIG picture if you will.

    If your teeth aren't loose, just start working on your breathing and body use.
     
  9. Bixel

    Bixel Pianissimo User

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