Pro horn vs student for learning

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by YTR-2335, Apr 2, 2006.

  1. YTR-2335

    YTR-2335 New Friend

    19
    0
    Mar 25, 2006
    RIght now I am learning on a yamaha YTR-2335. I've been told this is a very good student horn but would a professional horn be easier to learn on or would I not be able to tell any difference?
     
  2. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

    3,186
    977
    Mar 21, 2006
    Toronto
    You have been playing for a month if I remember correctly.
    Right now, just stick with what you have. Changing horns and mouthpeices is the last thing you want to do until you establish the foundations.
     
  3. YTR-2335

    YTR-2335 New Friend

    19
    0
    Mar 25, 2006

    Brekelefuw I speaking hypothetically. I have no intention of buying a new expensive horn right now. I just thought it would be interesting to ask.
     
  4. uatrmpt

    uatrmpt Piano User

    373
    10
    Nov 29, 2003
    AL
    "Student" horns are sometimes more forgiving than professional quality horns are. More resistance for undeveloped breath support, stiffer valve springs, etc. Of course, there are exceptions to this. The only think I would be concerned about is making sure that your third valve slide can move quickly and easily. It's important to go ahead and start learning to use it on low d's and c#'s.
     
  5. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

    4,529
    8
    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    If you've just started and you DO have a really decent student horn, then it'll likely take at least two years before you'd notice the difference between what you currently have and a pro-QUALITY horn anyway.

    (I stress "QUALITY"... there are horns marketed as pro horns that aren't as good as what you now have!)
     
  6. YTR-2335

    YTR-2335 New Friend

    19
    0
    Mar 25, 2006
    Thanks Tootsall. I kind of suspected that a beginner wouldn't be able to tell a differance though I had no intention of buying an expensive horn anyway.
     
  7. watchluvr4ever

    watchluvr4ever New Friend

    14
    0
    Mar 31, 2006
    Michigan
    Hello,

    I thought I would give you my experience on the YTR-2335. My first trumpet was a Yamaha YTR-2335, purchased almost 14 years ago. I was plagued for years with constant problems with my valves/pistons. This problem with my valves made my horn very unreliable. I had my horn serviced many, many times and the fixes only seemed to be temporary and the problems always came back. As I got older and I started using the third valve slide, I found out it was purely cosmetic. I had to send my horn in to get material removed from the tubing just to be able to use the slide. I am unsure if it was just my horn or Yamaha's of that time but I try not to recommend the Yamaha student models to anyone. It is very frustrating to have to worry about equipment problems when you are a student or if your even a pro for that matter. Very soon I will be starting one of my Son's on the trumpet and I am faced with the decision of picking the right horn for him. Right now a Bach Strad seems to be my choice for my Son, and he is only six years old. I figure if we don't have to worry about the equipment, we can spend more time making music.
     
  8. YTR-2335

    YTR-2335 New Friend

    19
    0
    Mar 25, 2006
    Wow! My 2335 is new but I did buy it off ebay so I don't know what year it is was actually made. Anyone know how to tell the year of manufacture by the serial#? I hope your case was an isolated incedent.
     
  9. watchluvr4ever

    watchluvr4ever New Friend

    14
    0
    Mar 31, 2006
    Michigan
    I'm not trying to scare you YTR-2335, and I hope you get much better results with your horn. My trumpet section was primarily made up of Yamahas and others didn't have the same problems that I had that I know of. One thing I do remember is my horn was slighlty different than others that had this same model. Most of my trumpet section had YTR-2335's that said JAPAN on the mouthpiece receiver and mine didn't. I'm pretty sure that my horn was made in the USA and the rest of my sections horns were made in Japan. The instrument cases were also slighly different too. My case was wood with a brown vinyl type skin covering and the Japan models were brown but made of a plastic shell.
     
  10. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

    4,529
    8
    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Yamaha did have some valve problems "back when" related to valve metalurgy (do a search for "Yamalloy"). Those problems have long been gone. If the horn is no more than 10 years old then it shouldn't be a problem.
     

Share This Page