Problem hitting one note (not high)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by kakeflekk, Jan 21, 2012.

  1. kakeflekk

    kakeflekk New Friend

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    Oct 27, 2011
    I have a really hard time playing playing the D in the middle of the staff. That's right, the one on the 4th ledge. When playing a song, it comes out as nothing, just air, or a really shitty tone. Playing it with first and third finger makes very easy to hit, but then it is very out of tune. Is there something wrong with me or my trumpet?
     
  2. NeonMarmot

    NeonMarmot New Friend

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    Buzz it on your mouthpiece!
     
  3. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Could be both. Give it a good bath, the trumpet of course. I tend to overblow that note making it the F. I dont think it is the mouthpiece, just play it with long tones. Then just do arpedigos and work on hitting it with a good tone and cleanly.
     
  4. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    A buddy of mine has a similar condition: His attacks on this note sound like he's chopping wood. Worse still it DOESN'T BOTHER HIM!!! Well shucks it sure drives me crazy. I can't say with 100% certainty why his or your problems exist. Nor even if they are related however i suspect that they are.

    This isn't a cure necessarily but I'd speculate that some portion of your upper lip shifts position around this note. Not something you're aware of. Or possibly could be aware of even if you tried! This may indicate an inherent tendency of your upper lip to switch to another "axis" at this point. Defining "axis" while useful is difficult.

    Sometimes we find trumpet players whose chops like to "break" right in the middle of the register. I've come to believe that they do this because their chops sit on the DIVIDING LINE between forward jaw and receded jaw playing position. Or:

    A. If they played more in a receded jaw position the D would speak normally. However the upper notes might not come so easily.

    B. If they played with a decidedly forward jaw but on a large inner rim dimension mouthpiece (than what they are accustomed to) they might defeat the problem more quickly.

    Advice (besides "keep practicing)??

    Some experimentation with mouthpiece dimensions could help you fine tune this note.

    Pedal tones (which I don't completely oppose but aren't always that totally high on for every player either) could help you dial in a better spot where that upper lip can rest when you hit the D Natural.

    These kinds of matters (like the absence of an upper register) are often caused by chop flesh that is too tense or too coarse to vibrate.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2012
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I can imagine two issues: spitkey cork is not sealing or desaster:


    If you have trouble in the middle of "normal" range, you have a much bigger mess than the kiddies here are in a position to analyse. Local357 is a pro and gave you information that you may not understand.

    You need to get LOOKED at by someone who knows better. The longer that you wait, the more you turn crap into habits that are much tougher to solve.

    I suspect serious body use issues, mouthpiece/lip interface issues, bad breathing, tongue in the way and tension from the hips up.

    Get someone else to play your horn. If they have no trouble, you now know what to do.
     
  6. kakeflekk

    kakeflekk New Friend

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    Oct 27, 2011
    Thank you for the answers. It's just that single note I have a problem with. I can play other higher or lower tones without problem. The corks are really old and they look bad, I suspect that they have something to do with it.
     
  7. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Could be a leak. Get rubber ones, they wont have a air hole and if you get the kind with the male/female kind you wont have to worry about it at all!
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Plug it up with a piece of soft chewing gum. If it is OK, you get off lucky. Normally C# disappears when the cork is bad.
     
  9. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    Check with a tuner if your horn is in tune.

    Some horns are just plain flat on the D (1.st valve) and makes it
    difficult to hit in tune on the fly if you are not aware of the problem.
    This can also make the note "dissappear".
    Cheap solution. Well woth a try :-)
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2012
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Third valve water key cork is often a culprit, but with some instruments any time the 3rd valve is used there needs to be a bit of slide adjustment and how much varys with both instrument and player. Too, some players are adept at lipping the elusive notes into center and others use a combination of slide and lip.
     

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