Problem with Upper Range on Trumpet above high G

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JazzMahn, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Piano User

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    There are boatloads of good advice in this thread and I am sure that some of it might even apply and be useful. However, none of us has seen or heard your daughter play. A couple of hours with a good teacher is worth all the free advice that is in this thread now or will ever be in this thread.
     
  2. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    I'm gunna buy myself some of those when I get a bit older :D see?
     
  3. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Feb 27, 2008
    In most cases pressure is a symptom of something else that is not working properly - it's not necessarily a problem in and of itself (although it can be).

    Using less mouthpiece pressure and increasing air pressure/speed/whatever is a good place to start, but if the lips and tongue aren't doing what they need to do it won't really solve the problem.

    You really need to get her to a good teacher as soon as possible.
     
  4. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    I know you are doing your best to teach her and that you have been playing a long time but, sometimes a good lesson or two from someone who is more "objective" will yield huge gains. If you really want to help her, pay for a lesson or a few from someone who is an acknowleged expert in this area.
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    A nasty, hateful exercise that works. (free, too!): Place the instrument on a table with the mouthpiece over the edge and let her play open tones without touching the horn, just her lips against the mouthpiece, and let her see how the trumpet moves away. (Philip Farkas)

    Part two: Have her play a comfortable note and purposefully pull the horn away until it sounds really "bad," then make it sound "better" just using her lips--that will train her to focus her chops and the muscles involved without messing up her brain with too many thoughts. (John Glasel)

    Hope you all have fun!
     

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