Problem with Valve 1?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Hitman0042, Aug 28, 2008.

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  1. Hitman0042

    Hitman0042 Banned

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    With Valve 1 when i hold it down for a while it someitmes gets stuck half way or comes up slowly. I put oil on it but it doesnt seem to work. What should i do?:dontknow:
     
  2. Schwab

    Schwab Mezzo Piano User Staff Member

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    I'm afraid thats what happens when you buy a cheap Chinese horn. Good luck.
     
  3. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    How are you pressing on it? With curled fingers and tips on the button? If your fingertip is moving up and down on the same axis as the center of the valve button the valve should not hang up. If that's how you're playing you need to make sure there isn't grit and gunk left from the valve lapping process, or that the new valve, not yet broken in, isn't being abraded by use and deposting filings in between the piston and cylinder.

    Even on a brand new $2200 Bach Strad they recommend careful daily cleaning when the horn is new because there will be break-in wear which results in deposits.

    Best not to play with knuckles and straight fingers, even though you see many players do it. Since you are learning you might as well learn right. There are other schools of thought about finger position, so your teacher may be telling you to use flat fingers. Your trumpet will prefer curved ones though.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hitman,
    the first rule of trumpet is that cleanliness is next to godliness. I bought a chinese pocket trumpet and it was not clean on the inside when new. All sorts of stuff was left over from the manufacturing process and I really had to scrub to get it clean.
    Unfortunately, the weaknesses of very inexpensive instruments are in the mechanical things like valves and slides.
    If my students came to me with a problem like this, we would dedicate a lesson to cleaning instruments (I do this once a year anyway with all of my kids!).

    The horn has to be completetly disassembled, cleaned, left to dry, oiled, greased and then reassembled. If the problem remains, the only solution is to get the horn looked at by a shop. If you still have a guarantee, get the store to exchange it before you start messing around.
     
  5. Hitman0042

    Hitman0042 Banned

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    Well it only happens sometimes. How will i pull the trumpet apart. You mean taking the slides out. i can do that. Then clean it with what? Water or something?
     
  6. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    Hitman,

    Don't scratch or drop the valves. They are the "heart" of the horn.

    A cheaper horn is likely to have valve problems. Sometimes that is not the case, but often it is.

    You've been given good advice by those who have shared previously. Hopefully, when the advice is followed the working of the valves might improve, but then again improvement may not come.

    Keep the valves clean of debris and oil as often as needed. Doesn't have to be "tons of oil", but applied lightly consistently. Your horn may require daily oiling during break-in and even later. You need to get used to taking the valves out to oil them, so this will be a time of learning. As I said, be careful not to scratch or drop them. Wipe them with a soft cloth.

    A cheaper horn is destined to give you trouble as often the valves are one of the short cuts in making cheaper horns. No easy way to say it. We've heard horror stories of valves coming apart in cheaper horns. Let us hope it is not your horn.

    Best wishes,

    Lloyd
     
  7. Bach219

    Bach219 Mezzo Piano User

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    I'm just gonna repeat what they say. On the bottom of the valves open up the caps and use your finger to clean the debris in there. Sometime when you play with trumpet sideways or tilted the valves push against the casings and scrape against them, eventually causing metal shavings, which in return make the valves stick.
     
  8. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Hitman,

    First, you should not have any cotton cloths in with the trumpet. Lint will get into the horn.
    I sold a good Bach to a high school kid and it was clean. A couple of months later his dad told me the valves locked up during marching band. I immediately went to his house and got the horn. When I pulled the valves and slides they were covered with lint. He had a cotton cloth in with the horn. The rag was clean but there was lint all over the inside of the horn.
    You must use a lint free cloth if you are going to wipe the valves. I don't wipe the valves. I just oil them.

    Since you have a Chinese horn I will suggest you get a tub big enough to hold the disassembles trumpet and parts and fill it with hot water and about 1/2 cup of Sodium Carbonate. Enough Sodium Carbonate to feel soapy. Soak the horn and parts in it for a few hours. You must take a trumpet snake and run it through all of the tubes. It will take out any manufacturing crud. If you don't own a snake with brushes on the ends you need to get one. Get it from the music store.

    Rinse the horn a lot to get the detergent out of it. Assemble the horn with slide grease on the tubing and valve oil on the valves.

    You need to oil the valves every day on a new or freshly cleaned horn.
    Good luck.
     
  9. mrmusicnotes

    mrmusicnotes Piano User

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    Hitman,when you say you put oil on it, I got a feeling your just putting oil on the stem and your not taking the valve out of the horn to oil.If this is the case,let your teacher explain how to oil and clean your horn.I know you are a new player and may not know the proper way to take care of your horn which is of utmost importance
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hitman,
    yes, you pull all the slides out. You also take the valves out. The valves themselves have felts so you can't completely submerse them in water. You have to wash them by hand, making sure that the felts don't get wet. The rest of the pieces can be put in the sink and covered with hot soapy water.

    I use a squirt of dishwashing liquid but Sodium Carbonate sounds interesting too. A good trumpet brush (snake) is required to scrub the inside of the horn.

    Proper oiling is critical too. You need to run a rag through the valve casing to dry it out as well as wiping the valves off. Oil floats on top of water, so if anything is "moist" the oil will NOT stick to the metal and that means that the valve could stick, or wear out faster.

    What makes a cheap horn cheap is the lack of TLC at the end of the production line. It takes time to properly break in a valve, it takes time to clean and inspect the horn. Time is money. Quality control is only possible if there is proper attention paid to the manufacturing process. That costs money too. Most of the time, we discover what corners were cut after the guarantee has run out.
     
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