problems with silver oxidation under Reunion Blues leather Valve Guard

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by zetka, Sep 17, 2011.

  1. homebilly

    homebilly Pianissimo User

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    Los Angeles & Paris, Fran
    made in china they are
     
  2. BrassEye

    BrassEye Pianissimo User

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    Sep 9, 2011
    Leather Specialties guards are extremely comfortable, but they don't prevent tarnish from forming underneath. I use an LS Deluxe and the valve block of my horn is almost as black as the OP's.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I'm lazy also and really don't favor the higher maintenance of polishing a silver instrument, but Louis Armstrong had the only adequate solution to this problem. He used a hankerchief to hold his instrument, and if one became moist he had a back-up(s). Still now, a high quality man's white hankerchief is becoming more difficult to purchase and I haven't seen as many men wear them in their suit coat breast pocket as they once did. Too, the method of laundry for such has undergone a drastic change in product used and finishing. My mother didn't allow me to go to public school without one in my hip pocket as was cotton, but on Sunday to go to church it was linen as was the one in my breast pocket. Now I too seldom put one in my breast pocket.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Whoa, if you're talking China, now you have to worry about lead (Pb)!
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Louis also ate Red Beans and Rice. Much safer than eggs... that is if you are standing IN FRONT of the trumpeter.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    There is a method used by some small-scale beer brewers to reduce the amount of lead salts on the surface of fittings that come into contact with the beer using mild acid passivation . One simple method is to mix 2 parts common vinegar (5% acetic acid) with 1 part hydrogen peroxide (3%), then soak the object in the solution for 5-10 minutes. The brass should turn a pale, dull yellow color; if it darkens, then the immersion was too long so the part should be cleaned and re-done in a new batch of the solution. There are also some commercial solutions designed for passivation of lead on brass fittings and fixtures. Do an Internet search on "brass passivation" to locate additional resources. The original post can be found at: REMOVING LEAD FROM BRASS


    OR THE DR.'s SOLUTION: Just drink a heck of a lot o' beer while playing, and you will no longer be worrying about getting the lead out of your brass.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    A similar solution to the Louis Armstrong method that I use is to keep the handkerchief at my music stand. During each song (when I am resting) I will wipe down the valve casing (and any other tubing that my hand print may have made), and in that way, not have to deal with the slipping handkerchief or adjust my grip to maintain it's positioning. The results are the same, the sweat is removed before a reaction can take place, AND I save tons of money in buying all those handkerchiefs.
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Jackson NC
    Who knows all the chemicals in all the products we import? I know that Cadmium is now on our hazards list and is common in paints, particularly yellow and red. Any who have a background in graphic art should know this. Yellow and Red color are reknown in Chinese culture.

    All I know is that I've worked with an awful lot of lead and cadmium contained products in my lifetime, and even much more dangerous chemicals than these.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Vojtech,
    I am an American living in Germany. My wifes family "emigrated" from Jihlava after the second world war (vyhnání I believe is the correct word). I was there for 10 days this summer. Wonderful country!

    Salt actually helps as it makes the water more conductive.
     
  10. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Toronto
    The cause of the quick tarnish is probably due to a process called off-gassing, where something in the leather guard gives off a bit of sulphur gas. This has been seen in a number of Chinese instrument cases, where the plastic off-gasses, turning flutes black or yellow in a matter of weeks.
    The solutions have been given. There are various polishing products available as well, such as one with Twinkle in the name that rub on, dry, and then rub off the tarnish. The shop I work at also has a horrible sulphur smelling liquid we immerse silver in that removes tarnish nearly instantly, but I am not sure what it is called. make sure to wear proper PPEs
     

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