Production of tone and articulation/Point of attack.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Double_G, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. Double_G

    Double_G Pianissimo User

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    May 4, 2005
    Gordonsville, TN
    I have noticed recently in my practices that I am losing my tone a bit when my articulations become more rapid. How can I remedy this? Got any tips or exercises.

    I have also noticed my point of attack is quite often incorrect. Van corrected my point of attack in lessons last year(I was tounging through my teeth). But, I guess I didn't really get the feel for the exact point where the tounge shoudl strike the ridge behind the teeth. Can anyone help me correct this with a exercise or something of the like. If long tones could have fixed it I am going to be very upset. :x
     
  2. BigBadWolf

    BigBadWolf Piano User

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    Los Angeles, CA
    Think about the end of the note.
     
  3. Double_G

    Double_G Pianissimo User

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    :shock: ? Explain please. :-?
     
  4. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    When you lose tone in rapid articulations, it means your tongue is moving too slow, and you're having to blow past the tongue to get to the lips. The tongue should interrupt air, not obstruct. The tongue should hit, then BACK OFF. Thats whats killing your tone in rapid articulations. your tongue is being lazy.

    Van
     
  5. Double_G

    Double_G Pianissimo User

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    Got a way to fix it when lessons start Tuesday?
     
  6. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Just think about this problem, and visualize what you need to to change this. That works better than anything I can give you. Also, be sure to play through pieces or exerpts that require the lighter articulations.

    I do have a good exercise for it.

    Van
     
  7. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    I think it really doesnt matter where you tongue as long as it sounds good.

    Try single tonguing Arban's page 183 to work it out.
     
  8. tptshark

    tptshark Pianissimo User

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    I always try to think of a constant stream of compressed air, with the tongue "bouncing" up to it. The airstream never stops, but is interrupted for the smallest possible time as the tongue flicks up to the back of the teeth. When the tongue hits it should be immediately "blown" back from whence it came by the strength of the air column.

    In my experience, sloppy tonguing more often than not results from not enough compression in the airstream. Practice Clarke studies slowly, concentrating on maintianing the air column.

    Hope that helps you - good luck!
     
  9. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Brooklyn,NY
    For me, speech has always been the answer.
    My tongue is placed where I say the words"The or They." Thou and Though also work. Say the words in sixteenth notes.....feel the action of the tongue.
    Play a G in the staff, tonguing the same place.
    I use the tip of the tongue on the front teeth.
    Keep it simple :cool:
    Wilmer
     
  10. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    Consistent placement can also be brought about through flutter-tonguing the long notes in Arban's syncopation studies. Also, look at Longinotti etude #2. Try for a smooth connected style of articulation; think of the forte as indicating "full", rather than loud.
     

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